Beth R. Friedland M.D. Helps Patients Cope with Seasonal Eye Irritations

Park 04-20-15 Tina Phillips fdpSpring is in full swing as we quickly head into May in the Raleigh-Durham area and the flowers popping up everywhere. The JC Raulston Arboretum at North Carolina State has begun it free guided tours for the season and our local Triangle gardeners are busily planting tomatoes and squash in their backyards. But all this outdoor wonder isn’t so great if seasonal pollen causes red, itchy eyes. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology is an expert in eye conditions and helps her Triangle area clients understand how to prevent and treat red, irritated eyes.

Park Ophthalmology presents four points everyone should know about in reference to eye irritations and how to treat them:

  • Symptoms: Irritants can cause redness in the whites of the eyes or the inner eyelids. Excessive tearing, burning or blurred vision can also be signed of eyes reacting to irritants from the environment. Light sensitivity, swelling of the eyelids and itchiness are all symptoms that might require a trip to Dr. Friedland’s office.
  • Why allergies are serious: Pet dander, pollen, smoke and other allergens can irritate the eyes. Histamines are created and released when the body detects a foreign substance, such as an allergen. It is this immune response that causes classic allergy symptoms.
  • Don’t rub the eyes: It is natural to attempt relief by rubbing itchy eyes, but this won’t help. In fact, it may make the eyes worse by causing a release of more of the cells that first caused the itchiness. Instead, apply a cool compress, avoid makeup and wash hands often.
  • Minimize the problems: If Dr. Friedland confirms that seasonal triggers are causing eye allergies, try to stay indoors on high pollen count days. Use the air conditioner and leave windows closed. Sunglasses can help keep the offending pollen away from eyes.

It’s no fun to greet the spring with red and irritated eyes. Contact Park Ophthalmology today if you notice excessive tearing, burning, or itchiness in your eyes. Dr. Friedland will determine whether seasonal allergies are the source, and then provide treatment to ease the problem.

Make an appointment today and give your eyes the break they need in the battle of the pollen!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Tina Philips, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Details Eye Injury Prevention

arztsamui, fdpGlasses not only help people have better vision, they also protect the eyes from certain injuries. Yet, glasses alone are not enough to protect eyes from injuries common to some sports and activities. The American Academy of Ophthalmology reports that thousands of preventable eye injuries occur each year during sports and other recreational activities.

Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology urges Triangle area residents to take proper precautions to protect eyesight while engaged in the following activities:

  • High-risk sports: Although they do not appear to carry much risk; baseball, racket sports, and basketball account for the most eye injuries in all age groups. Helmets with a plastic or wire shield can provide protection for baseball, hockey and lacrosse players. Protective goggles with shatterproof lenses should be used for racket sports, basketball, skiing and snowboarding.
  • Hobbies: Surprisingly, fishing is the top cause of sports-related eye injuries, according to the U.S. Eye Injury Registry. Even activities at home, including woodworking, yard maintenance and home repair, cause a substantial number of eye injuries annually in the United States. If there is any risk of flying debris, use protective eyewear during tasks and hobbies.
  • House cleaning and cooking: Some cleaning products can be dangerous to the eyes. Read labels for warnings and for advice on what to do if any chemicals get into the eyes. In the kitchen, hot oil and grease can splash or pop at high heat and send droplets flying toward your face. Use grease shields on pans to prevent dangerous splatters.
  • Fireworks: By-standers can be injured by fireworks. Sadly, it does happen. The American Academy of Ophthalmology reports that common eye injuries from fireworks include burns, cuts, retinal detachment, and optic nerve damage. The safest place to view fireworks is at a professional display.

Anyone who sustains an eye injury should contact Park Ophthalmology or the emergency room medical doctor as soon as possible. Dr. Friedland is always happy to answer patient questions about proper protective eyewear. Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule a complete vision examination.

The staff at Park Ophthalmology wishes all of our patients and friends the warmest Hanukkah and Christmas Seasons and a Happy New Year!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: arztamui, freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Explains Common Terms for Eye Patients

woman with glassesBeth R. Friedland M.D. of Park Ophthalmology knows that accurate communication ensures the best eye health and vision possible for all of her patients in the Raleigh-Durham area. She is always eager to help patients understand as much as possible about vision and treatment options.

Dr. Friedland provides this brief list of common terms patients may hear during their eye exams:

  • 20/20 vision: The term “20/20” is used by many to mean “perfect vision.” As a standard, it means that objects 20 feet away are clear to the viewer. However, there are many other aspects to vision – peripheral sight, depth perception, color recognition and eye coordination. A person can have 20/20 vision but still have deficits in one or more of these other areas. Corrective lenses, whether glasses or contacts, are designed to provide vision that is as close to 20/20 as possible.
  • Nearsighted (myopia): Someone who has clearer vision up-close than at a distance has myopia, or nearsightedness. It is important to have clear distance vision for tasks such as driving and sports. Myopia can be corrected with glasses, contacts and sometimes refractive surgery.
  • Farsighted (hyperopia): Just as it sounds, the person who is farsighted sees objects more clearly in the distance than objects that are closer. Reading, computer work, crafts and cooking can all be more difficult for the person with hyperopia. Corrective lenses and surgery are options for patients with hyperopia.
  • Astigmatism: An initial eye examination may be the first time a person hears that he or she has astigmatism, a condition in which a person’s corneas (clear membranes covering the irises) are more oval than round. The American Academy of Ophthalmology estimates that one out of three Americans has astigmatism, often with resulting myopia or hyperopia.
  • Presbyopia: As people enter middle-age, many find themselves holding a book or newspaper at arm’s length to bring it into focus. This is a natural part of aging and is called presbyopia.

Educating patients about their vision is a top priority at Park Ophthalmology. Contact the office today with questions or to schedule a comprehensive vision exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

 

5 Suggestions for Eye Health from Park Ophthalmology of the Triangle

sunglasses stock imagesResidents in the Triangle area might think their eyes are playing tricks on them as skeletons pop out of the neighbor’s lawn next door and witches loom from front porches. It is the Halloween Season across Wake and Durham County. Spooky stuff is just part of the annual preparation for Halloween. However, there is no trick or treat when taking care of vision. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in Durham and Raleigh wants all of her patients to have the best eye sight possible so they can see both the adorable and the scary costumes of all the kids as they trick-or-treat!

To achieve that goal, Doctor Friedland offers five suggestions for eye health that are simple and easy for everyone to follow:

  • Wear Sunglasses: Fans of the rock group U2 were surprised recently when they discovered that lead singer Bono always wears sunglasses because he has glaucoma, which makes eyes extremely sensitive to light. It is interesting to note that sunglasses aren’t just for those with glaucoma. Prolonged exposure to sunshine can create cataracts on the eyes. Sunglasses and hats help to prevent that type of damage.
  • Take Proper Care of Lenses: Contact lens wearers can prevent many problems, including infections, by following directions provided by Park Ophthalmology. Good practices include proper daily cleaning of the lenses, changing them as recommended and contacting the doctor if the lenses don’t fit right or fail to sufficiently correct vision.
  • Keep Scheduled Appointments: Park Ophthalmology schedules appointments at intervals that are appropriate for individual patients. Keeping regular appointments ensures that Dr. Friedland will always be current on a patient’s status.
  • Communicate with the Office: Changes in vision and some new medical conditions should be reported to Park Ophthalmology. A quick phone call to the office will help determine whether an appointment needs to be moved up.
  • Treat Glasses Well: Frames can break and lenses can get scratched or nicked. When not in use, put glasses back in their case to prevent damage. Bent wire frames can impair proper vision and should be quickly repaired.

Park Ophthalmology staff and Dr. Beth L. Friedland always will make sure patients know the best practices for maintaining their eye health. Call today to schedule an appointment.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the eye strain and eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Stockimages, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Eye Conditions in the Triangle Need Prompt Evaluation by Park Ophthalmology

Woman_Reading PO 10-14 1Crisp fall days in the Triangle are perfect for taking in the beauty of North Carolina as the trees transform their leaves from green to vibrant orange and red. Healthy eyes and clear vision enhances enjoyment of a hike through Eno River State Park or a walking food tour in Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Durham or Cary. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle helps both new and established patients see the world with focus.

Here are five indications that it is time to call Park Ophthalmology to schedule an eye examination, even if it isn’t time for an annual exam:

  • Headaches: Pain in the eyes or the head might be a signal that the existing prescription for glasses or contacts needs to be changed. Squinting and straining to see text, craftwork, road signs or the television could be causing discomfort and headaches that can be remedied by proper correction.
  • New Medical Diagnosis: Some medical conditions can affect vision. Anyone newly diagnosed with diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or thyroid disease should contact Park Ophthalmology. Many auto-immune diseases, including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can impair eye health.
  • Family History: Glaucoma is a serious disease that needs close monitoring. It can develop and grow worse without obvious symptoms. Anyone with a family history of glaucoma should see an ophthalmologist regularly to catch this condition early and begin treatment.
  • Starting Certain Medications: Several prescription drugs have potential to impair vision. The list includes acne medication, corticosteroids, antibiotics for tuberculosis, erectile dysfunction drugs, antimalarial medication (used for several auto-immune disorders), tamoxifen, and Flomax.
  • Sudden Changes in Vision: Double-vision, blurred vision, or sudden changes to vision may clear up without attention. But these also could signal more serious problems, including glaucoma, a torn or detached retina, or stroke. Get professional attention promptly to determine what is causing the vision changes.

Any patient with questions about a new medical condition or prescription drug, or with other vision issues, should contact Park Ophthalmology today to discuss those concerns.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It is Time to Schedule a Comprehensive Eye Exam with Park Ophthalmology

Mister GC, freedigitalphotos.netIt’s almost Labor Day weekend. 2014 is flying by! Many people in The Triangle are making plans for a holiday weekend at the coast or in the mountains, preparing to say goodbye to summer 2014. With Labor Day weekend being the final hoorah of summer, normalcy will soon return with school and fall related activities.

As schedules change, it’s easier to schedule appointments—for example, maybe it’s time to put that physical on your calendar. In fact, scheduling a yearly physical is quite common, and physicals are even required for some occupations. While here at Park Ophthalmology we believe it’s important to visit your doctor, we also advise keeping healthy by scheduling eye exams regularly every year as well.

These patients should receive annual comprehensive eye exams (as recommended by the AOA):

  •  Adults over age 60 and “At risk” adults:
  • Those with a family history of eye disease
  • Those diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Those with careers that are hazardous to the eyes/strain vision
  • Those taking medications that have eye-related side effects
  • Those who have had eye surgery or injured their eyes

Adults ages 18-60 should receive an eye exam every two years, unless they fall into one of the above-listed categories.

A comprehensive eye exam allows Doctor Beth Friedland at Park Ophthalmology to evaluate the eyes for many health considerations, and new prescriptions the patients may need. For example, these exams are crucial for assessing how well patients’ eyes are functioning together and they help prevent eye disease. A comprehensive eye exam can also provide insight to a patient’s overall health. Ophthalmologists are able to discover signs of diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure.

Remember, a vision screening is different from a comprehensive eye exam. While a primary care doctor can provide patients with a vision screening, only an ophthalmologist can perform a medically-focused and comprehensive eye exam.

**

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: Mister GC, freedigitalphotos.net

Chlorine’s Effects on the Eyes

arztsamui, fdpThe cold, bright blue pool water here in the Triangle feels so refreshing in the summertime heat! Not only is swimming a great way to cool off, but it’s also great exercise. From diving for rings to making a splash with cannonballs, few residents in the Triangle would argue that an afternoon at the pool is anything short of a summer day well-spent. However, it’s important to practice proper eye care in the pool!

What really causes red, irritated eyes after swimming? It’s most often the result of dehydration of the cornea due to chlorine exposure. The irritation can sometimes be accompanied (temporarily) by blurry vision. Although this usually goes away within minutes, the ability to recover quickly reduces as we age. And there really is no quick way to sooth irritated eyes. Doctor approved lubricating eye drops for dryness, and cold compresses can help to reduce inflammation and irritation.

Another risk non-goggle-wearing swimmers face is an eye infection because sweat isn’t the only thing that gets washed away while swimming! If a swimmer’s eyes are open in the pool, the tear film (which protects the cornea) can be affected. When this happens, eyes are more prone to infections like conjunctivitis (pink eye) because the tear film isn’t doing its job protecting the eyes from dirt and bacteria. If eyes have been exposed to chlorine, be sure to flush them thoroughly with warm water or saline solution to get rid of irritants on the eye’s surface.

Contact-wearers, be sure to remove the contact lenses before going for a swim. This will help prevent an uncomfortable infection called Acanthamoebic Keratitis. This condition is caused by a type of amoeba getting stuck between the cornea and contact lens. If left untreated, this can lead to ulcers on the cornea and permanent vision problems. If contacts have been left in while swimming, be sure to remove the lenses, rinse them with lens solution, and avoid sleeping in them after swimming.

When does a patient come in to see Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology? If swimmers are experiencing irritation for more than a few hours after getting out of the pool, aren’t responding to home remedies, or experiencing eye discharge, it is time to see the Doctor.

Remember, the best care is preventative care. Wear well-fitting, water-tight goggles to keep eyes healthy this summer.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: Arztsamui, freedigitalphotos.net

2 Reasons Your Eyes Need Sleep

iosphere sleepIt is 2014, and sleep is so overrated these days. Many people will share the fact that it is a full third of the day wasted. The time could certainly be put to better use. Is a good night’s sleep really necessary?

Pulling an occasional all-nighter to finish the work shouldn’t cause very serious problems or concerns, but doing it often can affect health. It is not just about exhaustion or the dark circles under the eyes; people risk a lot more than that. Our bodies, especially our eyes, need rest. Studies have shown that our eyes, in particular, require a minimum of five hours of sleep to rejuvenate and become fully functional the next day.

  • Paying attention to eye health is very important: If someone is suffering from lack of sleep, the eyes will be the first sign. One common, and often ignored, side effect is eye spasms (called Myokymia). These irritating tremors do not cause any damage to vision, but are a clear sign that sleep is needed. Dry eye (which causes itching, light sensitivity, redness, pain, blurred vision, and pain) is another possibility when sleep deprived.

If patients ignore the warnings that eyes give in signals, extended sleep loss could lead to much more severe eye health issues from the added stress, such as visible blood vessels in the eye.

  • Consistency is a key factor: Typically, everyone believes that sleep is an eight hour rest activity. This average does not necessarily cross all age groups. Studies have shown that people in their 20’s should actually get closer to nine hours a night, and older adults may actually need fewer hours of sleep. The truth is that the ideal amount of daily sleep may differ for every single person, regardless of age. The best practice for overall health, including important eye health, is to be consistent with sleep patterns.

Another helpful practice for eye health and rejuvenation is resting the eyes during the day. This is especially important for those individuals who constantly use computer screens. The strategy is to close the eyes periodically for longer than just a blink. This will allow your eyes to rest and can help prevent eye strain.

If suffering from chronic sleep loss and tiredness, and not simply staying awake to work or have fun), it may be due to sleep apnea. As addressed by Park Ophthalmology, sleep apnea is an irregular breathing pattern that could raise the following health concerns: swelling of the optic nerves, floppy eyelid syndrome, and even glaucoma.

If you are experiencing any problems with your eyes due to sleep loss, call Dr. Beth Friedlandat Park Ophthalmology immediately to make an appointment.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

 

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

 

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: Iosphere, freedigitalphotos.net

 

Eyes Need Nourishment Too!

Salad apoloniaSummer is in full swing, and you can definitely feel the sun in Raleigh! If you read our first post from June, you have been vigilantly protecting your eyes by staying out of the sun, wearing protective eye wear, and wearing clothing that blocks or screens the sun’s rays.

While those are excellent ways to keep your eyes healthy, it’s important to arm your eyes from the inside, too. To do this, nourish your body with nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids, lutein and zeaxanthin, beta-carotene, zinc, and vitamins A, C, and E.

Eating a balanced diet rich with these vitamins may protect your eyes from cataracts, macular degeneration, dry eyes, and night blindness. Although we encourage a healthy, balanced diet, be sure to talk with Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology in Raleigh and Durham before taking supplements. Taking too much and too many could be harmful.

Park Ophthalmology offers this informal guide for eye health:

Omega-3 Fatty Acids:

May prevent macular degeneration and dry eyes

In your diet:

  • Seafood
    • Wild salmon, tuna, mackerel
  • Nuts & oils
    • Walnuts, flaxseed, flaxseed oil, canola oil
  • Dark, leafy greens
    • Kale, spinach

Lutein & Zeaxanthin:

May prevent macular degeneration and cataracts

In your diet:

  • Leafy greens (richest in lutein and zeaxanthin)
    • Kale, spinach, collards, turnip greens, romaine lettuce
  • Vegetables
    • Corn, green peas, broccoli

Beta-Carotene:

May reduce the progression of macular degeneration (if taken with zinc and vitamins C and E)


In your diet:

  • Carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, kale, butternut squash

Zinc:

May decrease risk of night blindness; zinc may also decrease cataract progression and decrease the development of macular degeneration.

In your diet:

  • Quinoa
  • Garbanzo beans
  • Lentils
  • Meat & Seafood
    • Beef, lamb, turkey, shrimp
  • Seeds & Nuts
    • Sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, cashews

Vitamin A:

May protect against night blindness and dry eyes

In your diet:

  • Sweet potato
  • Leafy greens
    • Spinach, kale, mustard greens, collard greens, turnip greens
  • Carrots

Vitamin C:

May protect against reduce risk of cataracts and macular degeneration

In your diet:

  • Fruit
    • Papaya, strawberries, pineapple, oranges, kiwi
  • Vegetables
    • Bell Peppers, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower               

Vitamin E:

May reduce risk of advanced AMD when eating a diet rich in Vitamins E and C and carotenoids

In your diet:

  • Sunflower seeds, almonds, spinach, avocado, peanuts, asparagus, shrimp

Eyes are so important for so many reasons. Keep them healthy and you will be seeing for a long time.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

 

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

 

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

 

3 Reasons People Skip Eye Exams

graur codrinYou probably already know of friends and neighbors who find plenty of excuses to avoid getting a regular eye exam. Many people across the Triangle and around Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill sometimes will question the necessity for yearly check-ups. Some people believe that their eyes are just fine because they would certainly notice if something was wrong. Others just find ways and excuses to adapt to problems with their vision.

Regardless of the reasons, not having an eye exam is pretty common. Recent studies show that 86 percent of people at risk for eye disease do not get an annual eye exam.

Alternatively, over 70 percent of Americans age 45 and older fear being blind more than being deaf. That is a powerful statistic. So why haven’t you called Beth R. Friedland M.D. and the professionals at Park Ophthalmology?

There are typically three reasons why people delay an eye exam:

  • Money: The costis generally an issue for many people. Individuals without health insurance or proper vision care may not believe they can afford regular eye exams. What many people with this concern don’t realize is that these exams can go a long way toward the prevention of expensive surgeries in the future. The cost of a regular eye exam is a small price to pay for the possible discovery of something serious. A problem that is caught early is a problem that has a better chance of being diagnosed and treated.
  • No problems: Many Triangle residents feel that they would notice if something was wrong. This simply isn’t always the case. Some serious eye conditions, such as glaucoma, have almost no symptoms. An eye doctor might even notice other health problems during your regular eye exam, allowing you to seek treatment before a problem worsens. https://parkophthalmology.wordpress.com/2012/09/10/4-eye-opening-health-concerns/
  • Exams are not fun: Finally, some people just don’t like going through the process of a complete eye exam. For some patients, it might be the dilating of the pupils. For others, it’s the puff of air. What people need to realize is that these tests, while not very enjoyable, do not hurt. What’s more, they can keep your eyes healthy and safe. Studies have shown that 80 percent of vision loss is actually preventable. The eyes give the human experience a wonderful picture of life. Lost vision is a huge challenge for many. Do not be in that number if it can be prevented.

Your eyesight gives you the ability to discover and take pleasure in the world around you. Be sure to care for it or you could lose that sight in the blink of an eye.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

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Photo: graur codrin, freedigitalphotos.net