In the Triangle, Developing Good Vision Habits Helps Prevent Eye Strain

Woman with tabletVision plays an important role every day in all of our lives. We know as well that some popular daily activities can strain the eyes, causing an annoying, but easily remedied, problem. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle (Durham and Raleigh) educates patients on simple and easy ways to avoid eye strain.

Symptoms common to eye strain include headaches, dry or watery eyes, blurred vision, difficulty focusing, fatigue and sensitivity to light. The popularity of electronic devices, such as smart phones and tablets, allow individuals to spend more time looking at bright screens.

Park Ophthalmology suggests that when doing prolonged intense visual work, whether reading or working on a computer, the following six habits can help prevent eye strain:

  • Position Devices Correctly: Being too close to a bright computer or tablet screen can stress the eyes. Try to sit about 25 inches away from the computer screen, with it slightly below eye level.
  • Take Frequent Breaks: When working intensely on a project, surfing the internet or playing a computer game, take a break every 20 minutes to rest the eyes. Focus on something across the room to give the eyes a rest.
  • Use Proper Lighting: Some people develop eye strain as a result of the computer screen’s glare. Filters can reduce glare and most devices have settings that reduce the screen brightness.
  • Adjust Text Size: Instead of straining to see text that is too small, use the computer settings to increase the text size or zoom in on images.
  • Get Enough Sleep: Lack of sleep is one of the main causes of eye strain. Even if a deadline is looming, take a break and close your eyes for a few minutes. A 10-minute power nap can do wonders.
  • Practice Good Habits: Use glasses or contact lenses with the most current prescription. Older, incorrect lenses will make the eyes have to work harder. Contact lenses users should remove them for sleep and make sure to follow proper cleaning procedures.

Eye strain is easily preventable by following good vision habits, but if it continues even with all these habits in place, it might be time to schedule an appointment with Park Ophthalmology.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye strain is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

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Sleep Apnea and Eye Health in the Triangle

imagerymajesticMany people in Raleigh and Durham have experienced sleep apnea. This inability to sleep correctly each night puts great strain on the body and affects many organs. While many may guess it impacts the heart, it might be surprising to note that it can also affect the human eye.

In turn, many individuals have excessive sleepiness during the day that affects both work and normal life. Sleep Apnea occurs when the muscles in the throat block the airway, causing breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep.

These continuous pauses can last from a few seconds to a few minutes and may occur up to 30 times per hour. The pauses cause the body to move out of a deep sleep into a lighter sleep. It is exhausting, and the human body agrees. After such exertion, the body does not receive the rest it truly needs causing sufferers to feel sleepy throughout the day.

The Mayo Clinic reports that more than 12 million people in the United States have Obstructive Sleep Apnea. This is not a small number. If you live in the Triangle and think you may have this condition, contact Park Ophthalmology for an evaluation from Beth R. Friedland M.D. today!

Sleep Apnea is a risk for several eye conditions including these important four:

  • Glaucoma: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) can cause two types of Glaucoma—the second most common cause of blindness. People with severe cases of sleep apnea tend to have more severe cases of glaucoma. It’s crucial for people with OSA to receive an annual eye examination to check for Glaucoma, especially if they experience any changes in vision.
  • Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: This disorder is uncomfortable to those who have it. It causes the eyelids to turn inside-out spontaneously during sleep, which leads to eye watering, stickiness, and blurred vision.
  • Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Nueropathy (NAION): While painless, people with this condition experience sudden vision loss in one eye, usually noticed upon wakening. Up to 6,000 people annually in the United States are diagnosed with NAION, which can cause irreversible vision loss.
  • Papilledema: Obstructive sleep apnea may also cause Papilledema, or swelling of the optic nerve. This swelling can lead to pressure, worsening vision and, in some cases, blindness. Although the links between these conditions and Obstructive Sleep Apnea are not always clear, knowing the links may exist can help ophthalmologists stay alert for these problems.

Call the team at Park Ophthalmology if you experience any signs of these conditions or excessive sleepiness. Remember, regular eye exams are critical to eye health!

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This article about Sleep Apnea is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: imagery majestic, freedigitalphotos.net

4 Health Concerns Park Ophthalmologists Can See!

eyes digitalartThere are many residents in the Triangle who ignore or postpone the scheduling of regular visits to the eye doctor. You may not realize it, but scheduling that visit to Park Ophthalmology can possibly go beyond simply needing a new pair of bifocals or contact lenses. The visit may just save your life.

Beth R. Friedland, M.D. gets a unique view into your health through the professional lens. The kaleidoscope beneath the surface reveals nerves, blood vessels, and tissue.

These are four health “blind spots” that may be revealed to Dr. Friedland during an eye examination:

  • Stroke: A stroke can be caused by a blocked artery or a burst blood vessel. Often, these factors can be assessed by your ophthalmologist. If you are at risk, you should schedule regular eye exams.
  • Diabetes: Some eye issues (including loss of vision) can be early indicators of diabetes. We can check for these symptoms while evaluating your eyes.

  • Autoimmune Diseases: Some symptoms of more serious problems, such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis, might begin in the eyes. White blood cells floating in part of the eye could reveal an infection that the body has been fighting. Dr. Beth can check for that and other signs and concerns.
  • Brain Tumors: Fortunately, this health concern is far more infrequent. There are indicators, such as loss of vision from a swollen optic disc that could reveal the necessity to be checked for a brain tumor.

Our ophthalmology team may not always find something severe, but taking a trip to Park Ophthalmology might just reveal a health “blind spot” that could save your life.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit: voices.yahoo.com

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

 

 

 

 

Are Different Color Eyes Trauma Indicators?

nirots eye colorBeth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology spends a lot of time staring into people’s eyes. The human eye tells a wide variety of stories to a skilled Ophthalmologist. The color of the iris is not something eye doctors usually check, but July 12th, 2013 is Different Colored Eyes Day. This national observance recognizes a condition called Heterochromia. Max Scherzer, current 13-0 as a Detroit Tiger Starting Pitcher and an  A.L. All Star this season, has this very uncommon condition seldom found in humans.

About Eye Color
Eye color is determined by the amount and distribution of melanin in the iris. That’s why babies tend to have blue eyes when born; the melanin has not yet been produced.

Most Raleigh and Durham residents have two eyes of the same color, but that’s no reason not to celebrate the diversity among different eye colors and the varying shades of blue, brown, green and hazel. The most common eye color is brown. Green is more rare; less than two percent of the world’s population is born with green eyes. It’s most often found in Northern Europe and Nordic countries. Even more rare is violet, amber or red-colored eyes, which are usually found in albinos.

Different Eye Colors

Fewer than 200,000 people in the U.S. have Heterochromia, a condition that’s usually caused by a disease or syndrome. In some cases, those with Heterochromia have one iris with two different colors.

While it may be tough for those with two different eye colors to pick one for a driver’s license, it’s generally not harmful. However, eye colors changing later in life might be a sign of an injury, trauma or developing health problem such as:

Sudden changes in eye color are a sign it’s time to schedule an appointment with Dr. Friedland. A thorough eye examination is needed to be sure this isn’t a symptom of a medical problem.

Fun with Eye Color

While the general concept of dominant genes seems to work most of the time in eye colors, it is still possible for generations of brown-eyed people to produce a blue-eyed individual because eye color is a multi-gene trait. Still, just for fun, check out this eye color calculator.

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Beth R. Friedland M.D. and Park Ophthalmology welcome patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

 

This article about different eye colors is brought to you by the professional team and the offices of Beth R. Friedland M.D. atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

 

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

 

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

5 Considerations When Buying Your Sunglasses

grantcochrane sportsSpring has sprung in the Triangle! Here in North Carolina, especially In Raleigh and Durham, we know the first day of spring is often the start of warmer weather and sunnier days.

While it’s nice to see spring again, at Park Ophthalmology we are keenly aware that sunlight is the main source of UV radiation, which can cause damage to your eyes without you being aware anything is happening. Multiple studies show that long hours in the sun without sunglasses will increase your chances of developing eye problems, including cataracts. Even low amounts of sunlight can increase your risk.

As the earth tilts itself more closely to catch the sun’s rays here in Central Carolina, be sure you’re protecting your eyes from the harsh glare by wearing sunglasses every chance you can get. While any set of sunglasses is better than not wearing them at all, there are five considerations before you go out and buy a pair:

  • Complete UVA/UVB Protection: Look for a label or sticker and make sure that the lenses block 99 to 100 percent of UVA/UVB rays or have UV 400 protection. The label might also say that the lenses meet ANSI Z80.3 blocking requirements, which is an industry standard.
  • Polarized Lenses: If you spend a lot of time on the lake or at the beach, consider polarized lenses, which reduce glare by filtering out sunlight that reflects off surfaces such as water. Note that this has nothing to do with UV protection, but can still can help prevent squinting.
  • Lens Quality: The price can often make the difference. Inexpensive sunglasses aren’t going to have the same clarity as a pair with high quality lenses.
  • Size Counts: If you don’t mind the feel, choose wraparound sunglasses, which block light from the sides, offering the broadest protection against UV damage.
  • Check the Fit: Sunglasses should be comfortable, yet fit snugly around your nose and ears. Choose a pair that fits close to your face around your eyebrows.

Extra tip: It’s important to note that UV eye damage is cumulative over a lifetime, so be sure your children have eye protection as well.

While we’re always happy to see our patients, by choosing the right pair of sunglasses, you’ll be less likely to stop in at Park Ophthalmology with a serious problem. Have a nice spring!

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: grant cochrane, freedigitalphotos.net

March is National Save Your Vision Month

David Catillo Dominici ComputerWith so much technology and business blended together here in the Triangle NC, our patients often spend a lot of time working in the Raleigh and Durham area staring at a computer a good part of the day. People who sit in front of computers and other related devices for long periods can often experience headaches or strain in the neck or back.

But the most common symptoms are often overlooked when it comes to eye strain;  blurred vision and dry eyes often are the result that contributes to computer vision eye problems.

March is National Save Your Vision Month. To save your vision while working, try these adjustments for healthy vision in front of your computer:

Your Computer Screen

  • Glare — Check your office or cubicle lighting and use window treatments to avoid a glare on the screen. If you’re using a glare reduction filter, make sure it has the American Optometric Association Seal of Acceptance.
  • Resolution — Use the highest resolution possible to improve your eye comfort.
  • Contrast — You don’t want the monitor too bright or too dim. Be sure you can easily read the letters and see the background.

Your Seated Position

  • Ergonomics — You can find a lot of information out on the web for suggested corrections that can help adjust your chair, computer and desk so that you won’t have any wrist, back or neck strain. For healthy eyes, be sure your monitor and keyboard are straight ahead. The top of the monitor should be just below horizontal eye level, and you should tilt the top of it away from you about 10 or 20 degrees.

Other Eye Tips

  • Check your prescription — Computers are usually further and higher than a typical reading task, so your bifocals may not work. Ask Dr. Beth your Park Ophthalmologist for help with choosing the right glasses for your type of work.
  • Take breaks — Rest your eyes every 20 minutes or so by looking far away, such as out a window for a different visual.

If you ever experience eye strain, blurred vision or dry eyes, talk to Park Ophthalmologist about all of the ways to help save your vision.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit:David Castillo Dominici, freedigitalphoto.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

 

May We All See to Give Thanks on Thanksgiving!

It’s the Holidays and Thanksgiving Week! This time of year all we tend to rush around a lot with holiday shopping in the Triangle at Crabtree in Raleigh, Beaver Commons in Apex or Southpointe in Durham. We go skating at Winterfest in Downtown Raleigh and we enjoy parties with friends and family from all over the Triangle Region.

But as you rush to and fro, take a moment to give thanks for many positives in your life. After all Thursday is Thanksgiving.

Here are two things to be thankful for that you may not have even thought of as the Christmas and Hanukkah Seasons begin:

1. You are reading this Thanksgiving Park Ophthalmology post. More than 3.3 million Americans age 40 years and older are either legally blind or are challenged with some form of vision loss. In the United States, the leading causes of blindness and vision issues are age-related eye diseases, such as Cataract, Glaucoma, age-related Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy.

2. You have choices when it comes to your eye health care. In America, we have so many choices that we often take them for granted. When you visit Park Ophthalmology or your regular Optometrist, you have multiple options for consideration.

Finally, there is one more thank you we want to highlight this Thanksgiving — our thanks to you, our patients. We love what we do each and every day, and we are grateful to you for choosing us at Park Ophthalmology!

With all the holiday rush, you may feel too busy to come in for your eye exam, or you might delay some vision problems that might be cropping up. The holidays are a great time to make an appointment because we are open much of the Holiday Season.

So give thanks for your eyesight, and stop by Park Ophthalmology.

Happy Thanksgiving from Drs. Friedland and Daluvoy and our entire staff!

Photo: debspoons, courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery.We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations in the Triangle NC:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology