Park Ophthalmology Helps Triangle Patients Understand Eye Surgery

man looking far awayWinter is approaching quickly in Raleigh-Durham. Triangle area residents are starting to enjoy ice skating at the Raleigh’s outdoor Winter Fest rink and visiting the area’s many light displays. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology wants all of her patients to fully enjoy the holiday season with the best vision possible.

For patients considering a consult and possible surgery to help improve vision, we offer a quick guide to the procedures Beth R. Friedland M.D. performs at Park Ophthalmology:

  • Small Incision Cataract Surgery: Affecting more than half of all Americans older than 65 and with a growing number much younger, cataracts form on the lenses of the eyes and result in blurred or cloudy vision. Cataract surgery is the most frequently performed surgery in the nation and is normally conducted on an out-patient basis. The surgeon makes a tiny incision in the lens and removes the cloudy material. A new artificial lens is then implanted in the eye.
  • Glaucoma Surgery: Eyes need good blood flow to stay healthy. Glaucoma is a condition in which fluid pressures in the eyes are so high that blood flow is reduced or stopped, resulting in vision loss. Glaucoma surgery works to lower the eye pressure and reduces the chances for more vision loss. This is usually an outpatient procedure as well.
  • Refractive Surgery: Patients with nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism can all benefit from refractive surgery. The goal of refractive surgery is to reshape the clear cornea at the front of the eye. This reshaping allows light to pass at the correct angel to the back of eye, the retina, improving vision enough for some people that glasses or contact lenses are no longer needed.
  • Laser Surgery: Because of their accuracy and precision, lasers are now the preferred tool for most eye surgeries. Procedures called LASIK, LASEK or PRK all use a laser to make the necessary corrections to vision. There is little to no discomfort during the surgery and healing is rapid.

Dr. Friedland gladly answers patient questions about when eye surgery could be the best option for improving vision. Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment for a thorough vision exam.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

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Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Explains Common Terms for Eye Patients

woman with glassesBeth R. Friedland M.D. of Park Ophthalmology knows that accurate communication ensures the best eye health and vision possible for all of her patients in the Raleigh-Durham area. She is always eager to help patients understand as much as possible about vision and treatment options.

Dr. Friedland provides this brief list of common terms patients may hear during their eye exams:

  • 20/20 vision: The term “20/20” is used by many to mean “perfect vision.” As a standard, it means that objects 20 feet away are clear to the viewer. However, there are many other aspects to vision – peripheral sight, depth perception, color recognition and eye coordination. A person can have 20/20 vision but still have deficits in one or more of these other areas. Corrective lenses, whether glasses or contacts, are designed to provide vision that is as close to 20/20 as possible.
  • Nearsighted (myopia): Someone who has clearer vision up-close than at a distance has myopia, or nearsightedness. It is important to have clear distance vision for tasks such as driving and sports. Myopia can be corrected with glasses, contacts and sometimes refractive surgery.
  • Farsighted (hyperopia): Just as it sounds, the person who is farsighted sees objects more clearly in the distance than objects that are closer. Reading, computer work, crafts and cooking can all be more difficult for the person with hyperopia. Corrective lenses and surgery are options for patients with hyperopia.
  • Astigmatism: An initial eye examination may be the first time a person hears that he or she has astigmatism, a condition in which a person’s corneas (clear membranes covering the irises) are more oval than round. The American Academy of Ophthalmology estimates that one out of three Americans has astigmatism, often with resulting myopia or hyperopia.
  • Presbyopia: As people enter middle-age, many find themselves holding a book or newspaper at arm’s length to bring it into focus. This is a natural part of aging and is called presbyopia.

Educating patients about their vision is a top priority at Park Ophthalmology. Contact the office today with questions or to schedule a comprehensive vision exam.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

 

Track Astigmatism with Regular Park Ophthalmology Appointments

arztsamui, fdpBlurry vision may be more than just nearsightedness or farsightedness. For some Park Ophthalmology patients, vision problems at any distance may be the result of astigmatism. Astigmatism is a natural condition, occurring in about one of every three people in the United States. The front surface of the eye, the cornea, is normally a sphere shape, like a basketball. This smooth surface refracts incoming light so we can see. People with astigmatism have a cornea shaped more like a football, protruding outward. This uneven shape distorts light rays as they enter the eye, causing blurry vision.

Astigmatism may occur in combination with near- and farsightedness, but it isn’t caused or made worse by sitting too close to the television or computer, squinting or reading in poor light. While astigmatism is not a harmful condition, people often notice blurriness while reading, driving, looking at a computer or doing other activities.

There are two ways Beth R. Friedland M.D. can correct astigmatism:

  • Glasses or contact lenses: People with slight astigmatism may not require corrective lenses, but most people require some correction to see properly, especially those with another vision problem. Those with an astigmatism can wear special contact lenses called toric lenses, which are able to bend light in one direction or another. People can also opt for gas permeable contact lenses. Dr. Beth Friedland can determine which option will work best.
  • Refractive surgery: Laser eye surgery can correct the shape of the cornea, making it more spherical. People with healthy eyes, free from disease, scars, or other retinal problems may have surgery. There are multiple types of surgeries to correct the corneal shape; Park Ophthalmology will decide which one is right based on the patient’s medical history and eye shape.

Astigmatism may increase slowly over time, making it more difficult to observe as years pass. That’s why annual eye exams are an important part of tracking eye health and vision changes. Those experiencing eye strain or blurry vision should contact Dr. Beth Friedland at Park Ophthalmology for an eye exam.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about astigmatism is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: Arztsamui, freedigitalphotos.net

5 Things Park Ophthalmologists Assess in an Annual Eye Exam

exam ponsulakVision is the most important of the five senses, yet not everyone in the Triangle heads to Park Opthalmology each year for an annual eye exam.

Eye exams aren’t just for keeping up eyeglass and contact lens prescriptions. Getting a complete eye exam each year is part of keeping patients healthy. March is National Save Your Vision Month, and it’s a great time to get an eye exam, whether it’s the first time or you are a regular at exams.

Eye exams cover more than just the big “E” at the top of the chart. Adults and children should have their eyes checked each year for changes in health. During an eye exam, our ophthalmologist will look at how the eyes work together, check for eye diseases, and evaluate the eyes as part of the patient’s overall health.

Here is what Beth R. Friedland M.D. is looking for when checking the eyes:

  • Strabismus – More commonly known as crossed eyes, Dr. Friedland will make sure the eyes are aligned.
  • Eye teaming problems – The eyes usually work together as a team, but sometimes they don’t, even if they appear aligned. We check to make sure the teamwork is on par.
  • Refractive error – Most people refer to a refractive error as nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. These can all be corrected by eyeglasses, contacts or surgery.
  • Eye diseases – Glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases are quite common. Some have no symptoms except inside the eyes. Catching such problems early can reduce the risk of permanent vision loss.
  • Other health problems – The blood vessels in the eyes often tell the story of a person’s overall health, and can often indicate other problems. If Dr. Beth Friedland sees something abnormal, she can alert a patient to visit a doctor.

It’s never too early to make an appointment for an annual eye exam. Make March the month to have it done. The last thing anyone wants is to be too late. Find out more about getting an eye exam at Park Ophthalmology.

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Photo: ponsulak, freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915