Five Quick Lessons on the Human Eye from Park Ophthalmology

blue eyeMost people rely on their vision as the primary sense for understanding the world around them. But human eyes are complicated with many components that must work together for the best possible vision. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle area makes it her practice to educate patients about eye health and vision understanding.

Park Ophthalmology offers an outlined summary, in simple terms, of the five major aspects of the human eye and their importance to our vision:

  • Visible parts of the eye: Most people can probably name the pupil, the black circle at the center of the eye that allows light to enter. The iris is the colored portion surrounding the pupil and the white surrounding part is called the sclera. Not visible but important to vision is the cornea, a clear dome that covers the iris and pupil.
  • Lens: The lens is positioned right behind the iris and pupil. The lens serves to focus light entering through the pupil to the back of the eye.
  • Retina: The retina is a delicate membrane that covers the inside of the back of the eye. It translates light waves into electrical signals for the brain to interpret as vision. In the center of the retina is the macula, a small pit that provides the clearest central vision. Cells within the retina are called rods and cones, with rods transmitting black and white images and cones transmitting color images.
  • Optic nerve: The optic nerve is the messenger that sends the electrical impulses from the retina and macula to the brain for processing.
  • Humors: Human eyes also have two kinds of liquid, or humors, that nourish the eyes and give them shape. The aqueous humor fills in the space between the cornea and lens and the vitreous humor fills out the area between the lens and the back of the eye.

Dr. Friedland welcomes all patient questions about their vision and how human eyes work. Do not hesitate to ask questions during an annual vision examination at Park Ophthalmology.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice by your Triangle Vision Specialist in Raleigh and Durham.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Freedigitalphotos.net

 

Sleep Apnea and Eye Health in the Triangle

imagerymajesticMany people in Raleigh and Durham have experienced sleep apnea. This inability to sleep correctly each night puts great strain on the body and affects many organs. While many may guess it impacts the heart, it might be surprising to note that it can also affect the human eye.

In turn, many individuals have excessive sleepiness during the day that affects both work and normal life. Sleep Apnea occurs when the muscles in the throat block the airway, causing breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep.

These continuous pauses can last from a few seconds to a few minutes and may occur up to 30 times per hour. The pauses cause the body to move out of a deep sleep into a lighter sleep. It is exhausting, and the human body agrees. After such exertion, the body does not receive the rest it truly needs causing sufferers to feel sleepy throughout the day.

The Mayo Clinic reports that more than 12 million people in the United States have Obstructive Sleep Apnea. This is not a small number. If you live in the Triangle and think you may have this condition, contact Park Ophthalmology for an evaluation from Beth R. Friedland M.D. today!

Sleep Apnea is a risk for several eye conditions including these important four:

  • Glaucoma: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) can cause two types of Glaucoma—the second most common cause of blindness. People with severe cases of sleep apnea tend to have more severe cases of glaucoma. It’s crucial for people with OSA to receive an annual eye examination to check for Glaucoma, especially if they experience any changes in vision.
  • Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: This disorder is uncomfortable to those who have it. It causes the eyelids to turn inside-out spontaneously during sleep, which leads to eye watering, stickiness, and blurred vision.
  • Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Nueropathy (NAION): While painless, people with this condition experience sudden vision loss in one eye, usually noticed upon wakening. Up to 6,000 people annually in the United States are diagnosed with NAION, which can cause irreversible vision loss.
  • Papilledema: Obstructive sleep apnea may also cause Papilledema, or swelling of the optic nerve. This swelling can lead to pressure, worsening vision and, in some cases, blindness. Although the links between these conditions and Obstructive Sleep Apnea are not always clear, knowing the links may exist can help ophthalmologists stay alert for these problems.

Call the team at Park Ophthalmology if you experience any signs of these conditions or excessive sleepiness. Remember, regular eye exams are critical to eye health!

**

This article about Sleep Apnea is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: imagery majestic, freedigitalphotos.net

It is Time to Schedule a Comprehensive Eye Exam with Park Ophthalmology

Mister GC, freedigitalphotos.netIt’s almost Labor Day weekend. 2014 is flying by! Many people in The Triangle are making plans for a holiday weekend at the coast or in the mountains, preparing to say goodbye to summer 2014. With Labor Day weekend being the final hoorah of summer, normalcy will soon return with school and fall related activities.

As schedules change, it’s easier to schedule appointments—for example, maybe it’s time to put that physical on your calendar. In fact, scheduling a yearly physical is quite common, and physicals are even required for some occupations. While here at Park Ophthalmology we believe it’s important to visit your doctor, we also advise keeping healthy by scheduling eye exams regularly every year as well.

These patients should receive annual comprehensive eye exams (as recommended by the AOA):

  •  Adults over age 60 and “At risk” adults:
  • Those with a family history of eye disease
  • Those diagnosed with diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Those with careers that are hazardous to the eyes/strain vision
  • Those taking medications that have eye-related side effects
  • Those who have had eye surgery or injured their eyes

Adults ages 18-60 should receive an eye exam every two years, unless they fall into one of the above-listed categories.

A comprehensive eye exam allows Doctor Beth Friedland at Park Ophthalmology to evaluate the eyes for many health considerations, and new prescriptions the patients may need. For example, these exams are crucial for assessing how well patients’ eyes are functioning together and they help prevent eye disease. A comprehensive eye exam can also provide insight to a patient’s overall health. Ophthalmologists are able to discover signs of diseases like diabetes or high blood pressure.

Remember, a vision screening is different from a comprehensive eye exam. While a primary care doctor can provide patients with a vision screening, only an ophthalmologist can perform a medically-focused and comprehensive eye exam.

**

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: Mister GC, freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Offers Five Tips for Healthy Eyes

imagery majesticIt’s back-to-school time in the Triangle for everyone from day care to college! Although it’s the beginning of the school year, there is only a third of a year left in 2014! Now is the perfect time to remember back to those New Year’s resolutions. Yes, there is still time to complete them!

Here at Park Opthalmology, Dr. Beth R. Friedland encourages everyone to get healthy and be healthy. There are many benefits of eating healthy, exercising, and maintaining a healthy weight. Because there are so many great ways to get healthy, eyesight often gets overlooked. There is a lot to see in the Triangle: a Durham Bulls game, nature along the greenways, and somuch more! Don’t miss a single moment as we head to the fall season.

Park Ophthalmology offers five important tips for healthy eyes. One tip to work on for each month the rest of the year:

  • Prevent Sun Damage – Sunshine and warm weather were great incentives for many who relocated to the Triangle. While getting a healthy dose of Vitamin D has its benefits, it’s important to protect your eyes, too. Wear a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and clothing that blocks or screens the sun’s rays.
  • Eat Healthy – What goes into the body can help prevent many eye diseases such as cataracts, macular degeneration, and dry eyes. Nourish your body with nutrients such as omega-3 fatty acids, lutein and zeaxanthin, beta-carotene, zinc, and vitamins A, C, and E.
  • Get Eye Exams Regularly – Preventative care is crucial to eye health. Adults over 40 should visit the eye doctor yearly. Children should visit the eye doctor for the first time between 6 and 12 months. While visiting an ophthalmologist, don’t underestimate the importance of accurate health history in order for your doctor to best assess risks and conditions and provide instruction for proper preventative care.
  • Avoid Digital Eye Strain – Too much time texting, sending emails, and sitting in front of a screen can damage eyes. Try these tips for eye health in the digital age!
  • Quit Smoking (or Don’t Start!) – Smoking can take its toll on much of the body, even the eyes. Research shows an increased risk of developing eye diseases that may lead to blindness.

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eye wear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for every patient and with offices in Durham and Raleigh, we are convenient to everyone here in Central Carolina. Give us a call today!

**

This article about eye exams is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: imagerymajestics, freedigitalphotos.net

Vitamins Can Keep Eyes Healthy

graur razvan ionutEye vitamins are something many Raleigh and Durham patients are asking more about at Park Ophthalmology. The importance of a healthy diet and its effect on the eyes are not new. In fact, eating a balanced diet can prevent many eye problems, such as age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and easing glaucoma. Several foods contain vitamins good for good eye health. However, many people are asking Park Ophthalmologists about multivitamins. Studies vary on the benefits and disadvantages of multivitamins. However, some vitamins are crucial to good eye health and if not obtained through food, may be taken in a capsule or tablet.

One of the most important vitamins for eye health is Lutein, often called “the eye vitamin” because it is one of two major carotenoids found as a color pigment in the human eye. Scientists believe it functions as a light filter, protecting the eye tissues from sunlight damage, which in turn prevents an array of eye issues.

Many multivitamins contain Lutein, but often contain just a small amount, and it is not known whether supplements work as well as Lutein eaten naturally. A healthy amount is six mg per day. Try adding some lutein-rich foods to your day, such as broccoli, corn, orange peppers, kiwi, grapes and squash. 

Here are nine other “eye vitamins” that prevent macular degeneration or reduce the risk of other eye health issues:

  • Beta-carotene: Carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, butternut squash, kale.
  • Bioflavonoids: (Flavonoids): Citrus fruits, tea, red wine, soy, legumes, blueberries, cherries.
  • Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Salmon, mackerel and other cold-water fish, walnuts.
  • Selenium: Seafood, brown rice, Brazil nuts.
  • Vitamin A: Eggs, butter, milk.
  • Vitamin C: Red and green peppers, strawberries, oranges, broccoli, cantaloupe.
  • Vitamin D: Salmon, sardines, milk.
  • Vitamin E: Almonds, sunflower seeds, hazelnuts.
  • Zinc: Oysters, beef, dark turkey meat.

Ultimately, a discussion about whether to take multivitamins to get these nutrients is between you and Beth R. Friedland M.D. and will be based on your personal health needs and choices. Ask Dr. Beth Friedland about the best practices for your good eye health.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye vitamins is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: Graur Razvan Ionut, fredigitalphotos.net

 

Not Just Dark Circles: Chronic Sleep Loss Affects Eyes

sira anamwong FDPFor many Raleigh and Durham residents, chronic sleep loss is considered normal and just a part of life we all have to accept. We enjoy our crazy busy lives on the run here in the Triangle. The real warriors plod on, working hard, parenting, enjoying night life and not getting enough sleep. All this despite the fact that sleep loss is linked to heart disease, weight gain, poor performance, diabetes — and eye health problems.

Park Ophthalmology recently addressed sleep apnea and the many health issues it can cause, including floppy eyelid syndrome, glaucoma, and swelling of the optic nerves.

However, even those without sleep apnea who do not get enough hours of shut-eye are risking eye health issues, and not just when it comes to droopy bags and dark circles. Sleep is how our bodies rest, rejuvenate, and prepare for another day. Studies show the human eye needs at least five hours of sleep per night to replenish itself and reach its full working potential.

One common side effect of sleep deprivation is eye spasms. Those annoying twitches are called Eyelid Myokymia. While they do not damage your vision, they can be disruptive. Lack of sleep is the main cause.

Sleep loss over a period of time can also cause other eye health issues, including popped blood vessels in the eye due to strain. Lack of sleep is also associated with dry eye, which causes pain, light sensitivity, itching, redness and blurred vision. Although not always connected to lack of sleep, resting the eyes during the day is also important, and can prevent eye strain, especially for those staring at computer screens all day.

Sleeping is often listed as an eight-hour activity for adults, but studies show individuals in their 20s actually need nine hours. While older adults may require less, the amount is different for everyone. Going to sleep and waking up at a consistent hour each day will help improve sleep and overall eye health.

If lack of sleep seems to be causing problems with your eyes, call Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology right away for an appointment.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about sleep and eye health is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: sira anamwong, freedigitalphotos.net

 

8 Myths & Truths about Contact Lenses

marin fdpMany people in Raleigh and Durham prefer to wear contact lenses instead of glasses. Meanwhile, many others come into our Park Ophthalmology locations and want to wear contacts but just aren’t sure they can, or aren’t sure of the cost.

There are many myths and truths about this popular method of vision correction, so let’s clear the picture a bit and discuss eight of them:

  • Myth: Contacts can pop out of the eye at any time.
    Truth: Very rarely happens; hard contacts used to do this sometimes, but these days, that does not happen.
  • Myth: Contacts can get lost behind the eye.
    Truth: A thin membrane covers your eye; it connects to the inside of your eyelids so they will not “swim” to the back of the eye.
  • Myth: Contacts are only for young people or those without an astigmatism.
    Truth: Those individuals with an astigmatism or bifocals can still wear contact lenses. Come in for a complete eye exam
    to find out whether contact lenses are right for you.
  • Myth: Contacts are uncomfortable.
    Truth: Most people don’t even notice they are wearing contact lenses. Any discomfort should be reported to the doctors at Park Ophthalmology so we can determine the cause.
  • Myth: Contacts are a lot of work.
    Truth: These days, contacts simply need to be put into solution each night for cleaning and disinfecting. Some people opt to wear “dailies”, which are thrown away each night.
  • Myth: Contacts can cause eye problems.
    Truth: Triangle residents who take care of their contacts rarely have any eye problems. Eye infections are usually the result of poor cleaning practices; the contact lens itself does not cause infection.
  • Myth: Putting in contacts is difficult.
    Truth: Those attempting to put in contacts for the first time may find it challenging, but the staff at Park Ophthalmology are happy to demonstrate techniques to pop the contacts right in without trouble. With practice, putting contacts in will seem as easy as putting glasses on.
  • Myth: Contacts are expensive.
    Truth: Many people find that a one-year supply of contacts is less expensive than a pair of glasses. Price varies greatly depending on the type of correction and insurance. Beth R. Friedland M.D. and the team at Park Ophthalmology can answer any questions about price.
                                                   

Ready for contacts but have more questions? Contact us to learn more about correcting vision with contact lenses.

**

Photo: marin, freedigitalphotos.net

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about different eye colors is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Wake and Durham County Students Need Back-to-School Eye Exams

kid_glassesWake and Durham County elementary and high school students need good eyesight to read the whiteboard, the computer screen and their textbooks. While many people who do not wear corrective lenses often do not need yearly eye exams, it’s a good idea to include one late summer or early fall as part of your child’s back-to-school regimen. Children who have difficulty reading or completing assignments may have vision disorders, making it harder to socialize, play sports and study.

More than 80 percent of the information children receive at school is presented visually, and regular eye exams will make sure a child doesn’t have any trouble taking in that information. In many cases, children do not realize they have eye issues and just sit closer to the board, never sharing this problem with teachers and Mom and Dad.

While many eye care professionals are checking whether a child’s vision is 20/20, at Park Ophthalmology, Beth R. Friedland M.D. also checks children for other vision disorders that may create learning problems.

The American Optometric Association (AOA) recommends that children get their first eye exam at six months, a second at age one, another at age three, and then just before they enter preschool or kindergarten.

In North Carolina, students are required to get a vision screening before elementary school. This comprehensive eye exam must be administered by a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist. After that, risk-free children should get eye exams every two years. However, children with high risk factors may need more frequent eye exams.

Seven risk factors include:

  • Premature birth or low birth weight
  • Infection of mother during pregnancy (examples: rubella, venereal disease, herpes, AIDS)
  • Developmental delays
  • Turned or crossed eyes
  • Family history of eye disease
  • High refractive error
  • Other physical illness or disease

Still, even children who are risk-free may experience changes in eye health from one year to the next. Observing a child’s behavior is a great way to tell if it is time for an extra eye exam to check for changes in vision or any vision disorders. Common symptoms of such changes include headaches, double vision, blurring, loss of place, difficulty copying from the whiteboard/blackboard, squinting, difficulty reading and sitting close to the TV and computer.

At Park Ophthalmology, Dr. Beth R. Friedland is happy to answer questions about your child’s changing eye health, no matter what time of year.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye exams for children is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Stuart Miles, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

What to Expect During an Eye Exam at Park Ophthalmology

Beth BiggerMany people move to the Triangle each and every week. And when they bring family as well, they need doctors, dentists, and even a good auto repair facility. The first eye exam with a new Ophthalmologist can be a very positive experience.  Many Raleigh and Durham residents who come to Beth R. Friedland M.D. and Park Ophthalmology for the first time are extremely pleased at the experience.

It is interesting to note that eye exams are actually easy to do and are completely painless. And these exams truly discover how healthy the sense of sight is for our patients.

Here is the breakdown of a patient visit to Park Ophthalmology:

What to Bring

  • A list of any prescription or non-prescription medications. Include vitamins, herbs and other non-traditional remedies.
  • Eyeglasses
  • Contact lens prescription
  • Insurance information

The Appointment Process

First, visitors check in at our helpful front desk and fill out a form about personal family health history and any history of eye problems.

Then, one of our eye care staff guides patients to a small room where they take a few eye tests. For most of the tests, patients are asked to look into what looks like a periscope.

These tests determine any eye health problems, such as glaucoma or cataracts. One of these tests people readily is the big chart with the letter “E” at the top.

These tests help Dr. Beth R. Friedland (see picture) determine whether someone is nearsighted, farsighted, or has a stigmatism. She will also check to see how someone’s eyes work together as a set. A few more tests are needed for people who want or need contact lenses.

Depending on the exam results, Dr. Friedland will discuss whether someone might need glasses or contacts to correct vision, or whether any other eye health issues should be corrected.

Cost of an Eye Exam

Paying for an eye exam is very simple at Park Ophthalmology, where our team will answer questions about billing and insurance. The cost varies based on a person’s insurance, out of pocket, or Medicare.

After their first eye exam, most people realize how important it is to get a checkup each year, especially if the patient is over age 40. Our team at Park Ophthalmology is happy to answer any questions from people who want to know more about eye exams. Please call our offices listed below.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit:

Locations in the Triangle NC:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Summer Sun Exposure Can Harm Eyes and Cause Cataracts

stock images sun glassesAt Park Ophthalmology we know that Raleigh and Durham’s sunny summer days may keep the flowers growing and the grass so green, but over time, excessive exposure to sunlight can often harm eyes as well, even causing cataracts.  A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye. The eye’s lens is located behind the colored part (iris) of the eye. As eyes age, the lens becomes less flexible and thicker. These changes can cause tissues to break down and clump together, clouding the lens.

Seeing through cloudy lenses is much like looking through a fogged-up window. The main cause of cataracts is aging, but excessive UV radiation from our sunny summer days can be a major factor.

Cataracts account for almost 15 million blind people worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. WHO estimates about 20 percent, or 3 million, of those cases are likely caused by UV radiation from the sun’s rays.

Preventing Cataracts

There are several other risk factors for cataracts, including diabetes, excessive alcohol consumption, family history, high blood pressure, obesity and smoking. 

People here in the Triangle with these risk factors should be especially careful when heading to the beach, working in the yard or attending a baseball game. Park Ophthalmology specializes in cataract care, but prevention is often the best cure!

Follow these three guidelines to prevent sun damage to your eyes: 

  • Stay out of the sun. While some sunlight is good for the body, wear a hat and cover up while outdoors to prevent too much exposure for both skin and eyes. The shade or an umbrella are not a guarantee, but a wide-brimmed hat can significantly reduce eye exposure to UVB radiation.
  • Wear UVA/UVB protection sunglasses year-round when outside. The sunglasses must block 99% or 100% of UVB and UVA rays. Get more tips for buying the right sunglasses
  • Wear clothing that blocks or screens the sun’s rays. Combine the clothes, sunglasses and of course, sunscreen for the best eye protection. 

This summer, please call our offices and make an appointment with Beth R. Friedland MD, your Triangle Eye Specialist!  If you have any of the above risk factors, please have your eyes examined to maintain optimum eye health.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: stock Images, freedigitalphotos.net