6 Ways Triangle College Students Can Maintain Eye Health

Park 08-03-15 nenetus FDP ID-100342606As the new school year and autumn quickly approach, Triangle area parents are helping their college-bound sons and daughters get ready for the big move to dormitory or apartment life and the exciting opportunity of higher education.

The staff at Park Ophthalmology and Beth R. Friedland M.D. offer six important ways students can maintain their eye health while away from home:

  • Keep contact lenses out of water: Although it is tempting to leave contacts in place for showering or swimming, the time saved isn’t worth the risk. Exposure to water makes contacts more susceptible to transmitting an eye infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis. Always use contact lens solution for cleaning, and never use tap water.
  • Enjoy some time outside: Studies have found that scholars grow increasingly nearsighted as they spend more years in school. A study presented to the American Academy of Ophthalmology in 2011 concluded that as young people increase their time outdoors, they reduce their risk of nearsightedness.
  • Wash hands: Everyone knows that hand washing is an effective way to prevent the spread of colds and flu. This simple habit also can prevent the spread of conjunctivitis, or pink eye.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule: Prevent eye strain by resting the eyes every 20 minutes while reading or working on the computer. Look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Use a smart phone’s timer to set a reminder to look up from the books or the computer screen or device.
  • Toss old makeup: Bacteria can grow in creams and liquids, including those liquid eye-liners and mascaras. Don’t share makeup with others and throw out makeup after three months or if diagnosed with an eye infection.
  • Use sports glasses: Many sports, including baseball, hockey, basketball and lacrosse, put players at risk for injuries, including scratches to the eye or broken bones around the eye. Players can find polycarbonate sports glasses to cut down the risk of injury from other players and equipment.

If your college-bound student needs an eye exam and check-up, call the office of Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment. Our staff and Dr. Friedland are always happy to share tips on eye health with our patients.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo: nenetus, freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

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Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., college, university, nearsightedness, myopia, studying, eye strain, sports vision, makeup, eye infections, contact lenses

 

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Not Just Dark Circles: Chronic Sleep Loss Affects Eyes

sira anamwong FDPFor many Raleigh and Durham residents, chronic sleep loss is considered normal and just a part of life we all have to accept. We enjoy our crazy busy lives on the run here in the Triangle. The real warriors plod on, working hard, parenting, enjoying night life and not getting enough sleep. All this despite the fact that sleep loss is linked to heart disease, weight gain, poor performance, diabetes — and eye health problems.

Park Ophthalmology recently addressed sleep apnea and the many health issues it can cause, including floppy eyelid syndrome, glaucoma, and swelling of the optic nerves.

However, even those without sleep apnea who do not get enough hours of shut-eye are risking eye health issues, and not just when it comes to droopy bags and dark circles. Sleep is how our bodies rest, rejuvenate, and prepare for another day. Studies show the human eye needs at least five hours of sleep per night to replenish itself and reach its full working potential.

One common side effect of sleep deprivation is eye spasms. Those annoying twitches are called Eyelid Myokymia. While they do not damage your vision, they can be disruptive. Lack of sleep is the main cause.

Sleep loss over a period of time can also cause other eye health issues, including popped blood vessels in the eye due to strain. Lack of sleep is also associated with dry eye, which causes pain, light sensitivity, itching, redness and blurred vision. Although not always connected to lack of sleep, resting the eyes during the day is also important, and can prevent eye strain, especially for those staring at computer screens all day.

Sleeping is often listed as an eight-hour activity for adults, but studies show individuals in their 20s actually need nine hours. While older adults may require less, the amount is different for everyone. Going to sleep and waking up at a consistent hour each day will help improve sleep and overall eye health.

If lack of sleep seems to be causing problems with your eyes, call Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology right away for an appointment.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about sleep and eye health is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: sira anamwong, freedigitalphotos.net

 

March is National Save Your Vision Month

David Catillo Dominici ComputerWith so much technology and business blended together here in the Triangle NC, our patients often spend a lot of time working in the Raleigh and Durham area staring at a computer a good part of the day. People who sit in front of computers and other related devices for long periods can often experience headaches or strain in the neck or back.

But the most common symptoms are often overlooked when it comes to eye strain;  blurred vision and dry eyes often are the result that contributes to computer vision eye problems.

March is National Save Your Vision Month. To save your vision while working, try these adjustments for healthy vision in front of your computer:

Your Computer Screen

  • Glare — Check your office or cubicle lighting and use window treatments to avoid a glare on the screen. If you’re using a glare reduction filter, make sure it has the American Optometric Association Seal of Acceptance.
  • Resolution — Use the highest resolution possible to improve your eye comfort.
  • Contrast — You don’t want the monitor too bright or too dim. Be sure you can easily read the letters and see the background.

Your Seated Position

  • Ergonomics — You can find a lot of information out on the web for suggested corrections that can help adjust your chair, computer and desk so that you won’t have any wrist, back or neck strain. For healthy eyes, be sure your monitor and keyboard are straight ahead. The top of the monitor should be just below horizontal eye level, and you should tilt the top of it away from you about 10 or 20 degrees.

Other Eye Tips

  • Check your prescription — Computers are usually further and higher than a typical reading task, so your bifocals may not work. Ask Dr. Beth your Park Ophthalmologist for help with choosing the right glasses for your type of work.
  • Take breaks — Rest your eyes every 20 minutes or so by looking far away, such as out a window for a different visual.

If you ever experience eye strain, blurred vision or dry eyes, talk to Park Ophthalmologist about all of the ways to help save your vision.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit:David Castillo Dominici, freedigitalphoto.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829