6 Low Vision Strategies to Help Seniors from Park Ophthalmology

Park 7-20-15 zirconicusso ID-100233460The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) has declared July “Celebrate Senior Independence Month” and has issued six helpful ideas for seniors diagnosed with low vision. According to the Academy, more than 2.5 million senior Americans have low vision, which cannot be improved by corrective lenses or surgery. Dr. Beth R. Friedland wants her patients in the Triangle to be aware of how they can retain their independence, even with a diagnosis of low vision. Park Ophthalmology is the Triangle’s trusted source for vision information.

Now, what is low vision? Low vision is a vision problem that is not correctable through any therapy or surgery. It might include partial vision, blurriness, tunnel vision, and in some cases blind spots. Many individuals in this inoperable situation can be considered legally blind.

Park Ophthalmology offers the AAO’s six tips for helping people with low vision maintain their independence:

  • Set the scene: A simple change, such as grouping furniture in small settings, means less distance vision is needed during conversations. Patterns in furniture and rugs can be visually confusing. Textured upholstery is better because it gives clues to the item by touch, rather than by sight.
  • Contrast and color: Items can be seen better when they are brightly colored or contrast with surroundings. Some areas for colors and contrasts include switch plates, steps, doorknobs, electrical outlets and landings.
  • Brighten it up: Those with low vision can benefit from brighter lighting. Add floor lamps or specific task lighting for crafts or cooking. Allow natural light in through the windows.
  • Tech solutions: Smartphones and tablets can be configured with larger text for reading. Voice command software can answer questions, automatically dial phone numbers, and create voice memos.
  • Remove hazards: Area rugs and waxed floors present slip and fall risks. Tape area rugs to the floor, use non-glare floor products and move electrical cords and cables from walkways.
  • Schedule regular eye exams: During a full eye exam, Dr. Friedland will determine the type and degree of vision loss. She will recommend appropriate treatment and follow-up care. Some low vision can get worse without monitoring and treatment so it is vitally important to keep a regular schedule of eye exams.

Concerned about yourself or a loved one with low vision? Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule a complete eye exam.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: zirconicusso, freedigitalphotos.net

 

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Eye Conditions in the Triangle Need Prompt Evaluation by Park Ophthalmology

Woman_Reading PO 10-14 1Crisp fall days in the Triangle are perfect for taking in the beauty of North Carolina as the trees transform their leaves from green to vibrant orange and red. Healthy eyes and clear vision enhances enjoyment of a hike through Eno River State Park or a walking food tour in Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Durham or Cary. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle helps both new and established patients see the world with focus.

Here are five indications that it is time to call Park Ophthalmology to schedule an eye examination, even if it isn’t time for an annual exam:

  • Headaches: Pain in the eyes or the head might be a signal that the existing prescription for glasses or contacts needs to be changed. Squinting and straining to see text, craftwork, road signs or the television could be causing discomfort and headaches that can be remedied by proper correction.
  • New Medical Diagnosis: Some medical conditions can affect vision. Anyone newly diagnosed with diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or thyroid disease should contact Park Ophthalmology. Many auto-immune diseases, including lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can impair eye health.
  • Family History: Glaucoma is a serious disease that needs close monitoring. It can develop and grow worse without obvious symptoms. Anyone with a family history of glaucoma should see an ophthalmologist regularly to catch this condition early and begin treatment.
  • Starting Certain Medications: Several prescription drugs have potential to impair vision. The list includes acne medication, corticosteroids, antibiotics for tuberculosis, erectile dysfunction drugs, antimalarial medication (used for several auto-immune disorders), tamoxifen, and Flomax.
  • Sudden Changes in Vision: Double-vision, blurred vision, or sudden changes to vision may clear up without attention. But these also could signal more serious problems, including glaucoma, a torn or detached retina, or stroke. Get professional attention promptly to determine what is causing the vision changes.

Any patient with questions about a new medical condition or prescription drug, or with other vision issues, should contact Park Ophthalmology today to discuss those concerns.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: FreeDigitalPhotos.net

8 Myths & Truths about Contact Lenses

marin fdpMany people in Raleigh and Durham prefer to wear contact lenses instead of glasses. Meanwhile, many others come into our Park Ophthalmology locations and want to wear contacts but just aren’t sure they can, or aren’t sure of the cost.

There are many myths and truths about this popular method of vision correction, so let’s clear the picture a bit and discuss eight of them:

  • Myth: Contacts can pop out of the eye at any time.
    Truth: Very rarely happens; hard contacts used to do this sometimes, but these days, that does not happen.
  • Myth: Contacts can get lost behind the eye.
    Truth: A thin membrane covers your eye; it connects to the inside of your eyelids so they will not “swim” to the back of the eye.
  • Myth: Contacts are only for young people or those without an astigmatism.
    Truth: Those individuals with an astigmatism or bifocals can still wear contact lenses. Come in for a complete eye exam
    to find out whether contact lenses are right for you.
  • Myth: Contacts are uncomfortable.
    Truth: Most people don’t even notice they are wearing contact lenses. Any discomfort should be reported to the doctors at Park Ophthalmology so we can determine the cause.
  • Myth: Contacts are a lot of work.
    Truth: These days, contacts simply need to be put into solution each night for cleaning and disinfecting. Some people opt to wear “dailies”, which are thrown away each night.
  • Myth: Contacts can cause eye problems.
    Truth: Triangle residents who take care of their contacts rarely have any eye problems. Eye infections are usually the result of poor cleaning practices; the contact lens itself does not cause infection.
  • Myth: Putting in contacts is difficult.
    Truth: Those attempting to put in contacts for the first time may find it challenging, but the staff at Park Ophthalmology are happy to demonstrate techniques to pop the contacts right in without trouble. With practice, putting contacts in will seem as easy as putting glasses on.
  • Myth: Contacts are expensive.
    Truth: Many people find that a one-year supply of contacts is less expensive than a pair of glasses. Price varies greatly depending on the type of correction and insurance. Beth R. Friedland M.D. and the team at Park Ophthalmology can answer any questions about price.
                                                   

Ready for contacts but have more questions? Contact us to learn more about correcting vision with contact lenses.

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Photo: marin, freedigitalphotos.net

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about different eye colors is brought to you by the professional team atPark Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915