Park Ophthalmology Keeps Triangle Patients in the Driver’s Seat

Park 04-06-15 pakorn fdpA quick trip to the store for eggs and milk can become difficult when vision impairs driving ability. Many vision conditions that hamper driving skills can be corrected with the right eyewear or surgery, provided by Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology. With offices located in Raleigh and Durham, Park Ophthalmology is convenient to everyone in the Triangle. It is important to note that vision is just one factor that makes for a safe driver. Experience, judgment, and response times also play important roles, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Any of the following four situations can make driving more difficult and might indicate it is time for a consultation with Beth R. Friedland M.D.:

  • Road signs: In unfamiliar areas, it is important to be able to read road signs. When vision impairs a driver’s ability to read road names and highway numbers, decision time may be reduced. If it is getting more difficult to read highway signs, it might be time for a new prescription.
  • Peripheral vision: Even while focusing on the road ahead, peripheral vision gives the driver information about vehicles approaching from either side. The American Academy of Ophthalmology notes that diseases such as glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa contribute to major deficits in peripheral vision.
  • Distance vision: If it is becoming more difficult to judge distances to and from other cars, it is probably time for a check-up. The good news, according to an article in EyeNet Magazine, is that researchers have not found a connection between moderate vision loss and crash-risk. Experienced drivers often find ways to compensate for vision deficits.
  • Night-time driving: This may be the area where age plays the biggest role, as older drivers find it more difficult to filter out glare from the new more powerful halogen head lamps. Driving becomes tougher in lower light situations. Dr. Friedland can help patients understand how their eye conditions affect night-time driving and provide strategies for coping.

Driving a car represents freedom and independence to residents in the Triangle. Stay current on your eye examinations and call Park Ophthalmology today if you have any concerns that vision might be affecting driving skills.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pakorn, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

 

4 Critical Facts about Color Vision from Park Ophthalmology

Park 03-23-15 Stuart Miles fdpThe Internet and social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ lit up recently over a discussion involving a picture of a dress that some people saw as gold and white while others saw blue and black. The photograph demonstrated some interesting scientific facts about how humans perceive color. With her educational and professional experience in Ophthalmology, Beth R. Friedland M.D. of Park Ophthalmology was not surprised that the photo created such a stir. Dr. Friedland understands why people sometimes see the same object as different colors.

Here are four facts about human color perception:

  • Eye structure: Cells at the back of the eye, the retina, allow humans to perceive different colors. Cells calls rods help distinguish light from dark while cones interpret light waves as green, red or blue. There are about six million cones in a human retina.
  • Color blindness: About eight percent of men and less than one percent of women are color blind, meaning they cannot distinguish among certain colors. Color blindness is often inherited. A person who has trouble distinguishing between colors may lack receptor cones for one color.
  • Testing: Park Ophthalmology can easily test patients for their color perception. Parents who suspect that their children might be having trouble with color vision should get them tested. The patient will view several cards that contain images made from colored dots. The patient’s ability to distinguish the images helps Dr. Friedland know whether there is a deficit in color perception.
  • Comparisons: Scientists have discovered that some animals don’t see the range of colors that humans do. Cats and dogs cannot perceive a human’s range of color, although they do have better vision in low light conditions than do humans. Bees and butterflies, however, can perceive more colors than humans. They can see ultraviolet light, an ability they use to detect ultraviolet patterns in the flowers they pollinate.

Dr. Friedland always helps her patients understand how human vision works and what treatments are available to provide the best vision possible. Whenever you notice any changes to your vision, contact Park Ophthalmology to schedule an eye examination.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Photo: arztsamui, freedigitalphotos.net

 

Understanding Cataracts from Beth R. Friedland M.D. & Park Ophthalmology

arztsamui freedigitalphotos.net.jpg 3-9-15Imagine trying to read a computer while looking through a piece of milky glass. This experience is similar to someone trying to see through advanced cataracts. Patients with cataracts here in the Triangle turn to Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology for her expertise in diagnosing and treating this condition.

The team at Park Ophthalmology offers five areas of importance summarizing information from the Mayo Clinic to help patients understand cataract causes and treatments.

Cataracts 101:

  • Clouded lens: A cataract develops as the lens of the eye, located behind the iris, becomes cloudy, causing light to scatter so that images on the retina become blurred.
  • Causes: Age, injury, some genetic disorders and health conditions, such as diabetes, increase the risk of developing cataracts. With age, the eyes’ lenses become more rigid and thicker. Tissues in the lenses may break down, forming clumps that cloud vision.
  • Types of cataracts: Nuclear cataracts affect the center of the lens and may make it more difficult for the patient to distinguish colors. Cortical cataracts begin on the edges of the lens and often cause people to be bothered by glare. Clients noticing halos around lights at night or those who have trouble seeing in bright light could have posterior subcapsular cataracts, which form at the back of the lens.
  • Diagnosis: As with other eye health procedures, Dr. Friedland will conduct a thorough examination to determine if a client’s vision troubles are related to cataracts. The exam will include the normal vision acuity test, a slit-lamp exam and dilation procedure so Dr. Friedland can examine the retina.
  • Treatment: Fortunately, ophthalmologists can offer effective treatment to restore most, sometimes all, of the vision lost to cataracts. Cataract surgery involves removal of the clouded lens and replacement with a new artificial lens that becomes a permanent replacement. Surgery can be performed on an out-patient basis, so there is no need for a hospital stay.

Anyone concerned about night vision, trouble with glare, or increasing problems with reading or driving should contact Park Ophthalmology to schedule a complete eye examination. An in-office exam is the only way to know for certain the cause of vision loss.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: arztsamui, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

5 Facts about Pink Eye Causes and Treatment in the Triangle

patrisyu FDP 02-16-15 ParkEye irritation is a common reason for visiting Park Ophthalmology in Durham and Raleigh. When the diagnosis is conjunctivitis, commonly called Pink Eye, medical treatment often is necessary. Dr. Beth R. Friedland wants her clients at Park Ophthalmology in Raleigh and Durham to understand the causes, symptoms and treatments for pink eye. Below she provides some important facts, provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Five important facts about Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis):

  • Common causes: Conjunctivitis can have a variety of causes. Sources include infections from bacteria or a virus, allergens, such as dust or pet dander, or irritants, such as chlorine or smoke. Some pink eye infections can be transmitted from one person to another.
  • Areas affected: Pink eye is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the tissue inside the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball. This inflammation turns the affected eye a pink or red color. The infection can spread from one eye to the other.
  • Symptoms: Conjunctivitis often feels as if there is dust or grit in the eye. There can be crusting on the eyelashes. Other symptoms include eye discharge, itching or burning, and increased sensitivity to light. Some people may notice blurred vision or eye pain.
  • Treatment: Pink eye caused by a virus should resolve without treatment in one to two weeks. Remove irritants (pet dander, dust, smoke) to help those sensitive to those factors. Eye drops can also help relieve irritation. When pink eye is caused by bacteria, eye drops with antibiotics can shorten the length of the infection. A visit to Park Ophthalmology will quickly determine whether eye drops or antibiotics are necessary for treatment.
  • Prevention: To prevent spreading contagious pink eye from one person to another, the affected person should frequently wash his or her hands and refrain from touching the affected eye. Family members should not share towels or washcloths.

Conjunctivitis usually is not a serious condition but it can be quite common, annoying and uncomfortable. Contact Dr. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology as soon as possible; if you notice unusual eye discharge, redness or irritation, it probably will not go away.

Annual exams are critical as well. If you have not had an eye exam since moving to the Triangle, make that important call today.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: patrisyu, freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., pink eye, conjunctivitis, causes, treatment, symptoms, allergens, viruses, bacteria, irritation

 

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Spotlights New Research with AMD

pannawat FreedigitalphotosRecent research may provide a clue into the origin of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), an eye condition that affects about 20 percent of Americans older than 75. Conducted by the University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, the study found that tiny calcium deposits within the eyes could play a role in the development of AMD. For those who would like to know more, Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology directs readers to an article on the website mdthink.com that summarizes the findings. A more detailed description of the work appears on the UCL website.

Five important characteristics about AMD:

  • Disease progression: AMD causes the vision to slowly deteriorate. It affects central vision first, causing objects straight ahead to appear blurry. This loss of clarity can interfere with daily tasks such as reading, cooking and driving.
  • Risk factors: The National Eye Institute reports that some people have a higher risk for developing AMD. Smokers have about twice the risk of non-smokers. AMD affects Caucasians more than those of other races. Those with a family history of AMD are also at increased risk.
  • Drusen deposits: A characteristic of AMD is the buildup of protein and fat deposits, called “drusen,” on the retina. The latest research also found tiny calcium spheres on the retina, which could be the starting point for the drusen buildup.
  • Earlier diagnosis: The research suggests that AMD can be diagnosed at an earlier stage if the calcium spheres can be seen on examination. Earlier diagnosis could result in better outcomes for patients, and possibly a technique for preventing or reversing the drusen buildup.
  • Prevention: Some lifestyle factors may help prevent AMD. The National Eye Institute advises not smoking, eating a diet rich in green leafy vegetables and fish, getting regular exercise and maintaining normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

An annual eye exam with Dr. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology includes testing for AMD. Call the office today to schedule your next appointment. It will make a difference.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pannawat, Freedigitalphotos.net

 

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Offers Full Range of Eye Care

arztsamui freedigitalphotos.netWhen first searching out a medical professional for eye care, patients can be confused by the differences among opticians, optometrists and ophthalmologists. As part of the on-going efforts to educate clients on all aspects of eye health, Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle area provides a quick introduction to the field of eye care. Her brief tutorial below will help Raleigh-Durham patients understand what kind of eye care professional they need to contact for their specific eye care needs:

The three types of vision care professionals:

  • Opticians: Opticians are professionals who make or sell glasses and contact lenses, for the purpose of correcting vision defects using the prescriptions of ophthalmologists and optometrists. They can check the fit of eyeglasses, help clients decide on the best frames and lenses, and check products to make sure an order has been filled correctly. They also can repair and adjust glasses. Those in need of corrective lenses need to first have an exam by an optometrist or ophthalmologist.
  • Optometrists: Unlike ophthalmologists such as Dr. Friedland, optometrists are not physicians. However, they have completed bachelor’s degrees and then received an additional four years of education to obtain a Doctor of Optometry degree. They perform eye examinations, write prescriptions for corrective lenses, diagnosis eye conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts, and can prescribe medications for eye conditions.
  • Ophthalmologists: Ophthalmologists have graduated from medical school, plus completed internships and residencies. In addition to conducting eye exams and prescribing corrective lenses, ophthalmologists also provide medical treatment for conditions such as glaucoma, eye injuries and infections. They perform surgery for eye problems that include cataracts, crossed eyes and glaucoma. Some ophthalmologists also offer plastic surgery for smoothing wrinkles around the eyes or for drooping eyelids.

Because of her extensive medical training, Beth R. Friedland MD can provide a complete range of eye health services. The friendly staff at Park Ophthalmology is always ready to answer questions about the services provided by Dr. Friedland.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Freedigitalphotoss.net

 

Five Quick Lessons on the Human Eye from Park Ophthalmology

blue eyeMost people rely on their vision as the primary sense for understanding the world around them. But human eyes are complicated with many components that must work together for the best possible vision. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle area makes it her practice to educate patients about eye health and vision understanding.

Park Ophthalmology offers an outlined summary, in simple terms, of the five major aspects of the human eye and their importance to our vision:

  • Visible parts of the eye: Most people can probably name the pupil, the black circle at the center of the eye that allows light to enter. The iris is the colored portion surrounding the pupil and the white surrounding part is called the sclera. Not visible but important to vision is the cornea, a clear dome that covers the iris and pupil.
  • Lens: The lens is positioned right behind the iris and pupil. The lens serves to focus light entering through the pupil to the back of the eye.
  • Retina: The retina is a delicate membrane that covers the inside of the back of the eye. It translates light waves into electrical signals for the brain to interpret as vision. In the center of the retina is the macula, a small pit that provides the clearest central vision. Cells within the retina are called rods and cones, with rods transmitting black and white images and cones transmitting color images.
  • Optic nerve: The optic nerve is the messenger that sends the electrical impulses from the retina and macula to the brain for processing.
  • Humors: Human eyes also have two kinds of liquid, or humors, that nourish the eyes and give them shape. The aqueous humor fills in the space between the cornea and lens and the vitreous humor fills out the area between the lens and the back of the eye.

Dr. Friedland welcomes all patient questions about their vision and how human eyes work. Do not hesitate to ask questions during an annual vision examination at Park Ophthalmology.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice by your Triangle Vision Specialist in Raleigh and Durham.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Freedigitalphotos.net

 

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Details Eye Injury Prevention

arztsamui, fdpGlasses not only help people have better vision, they also protect the eyes from certain injuries. Yet, glasses alone are not enough to protect eyes from injuries common to some sports and activities. The American Academy of Ophthalmology reports that thousands of preventable eye injuries occur each year during sports and other recreational activities.

Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology urges Triangle area residents to take proper precautions to protect eyesight while engaged in the following activities:

  • High-risk sports: Although they do not appear to carry much risk; baseball, racket sports, and basketball account for the most eye injuries in all age groups. Helmets with a plastic or wire shield can provide protection for baseball, hockey and lacrosse players. Protective goggles with shatterproof lenses should be used for racket sports, basketball, skiing and snowboarding.
  • Hobbies: Surprisingly, fishing is the top cause of sports-related eye injuries, according to the U.S. Eye Injury Registry. Even activities at home, including woodworking, yard maintenance and home repair, cause a substantial number of eye injuries annually in the United States. If there is any risk of flying debris, use protective eyewear during tasks and hobbies.
  • House cleaning and cooking: Some cleaning products can be dangerous to the eyes. Read labels for warnings and for advice on what to do if any chemicals get into the eyes. In the kitchen, hot oil and grease can splash or pop at high heat and send droplets flying toward your face. Use grease shields on pans to prevent dangerous splatters.
  • Fireworks: By-standers can be injured by fireworks. Sadly, it does happen. The American Academy of Ophthalmology reports that common eye injuries from fireworks include burns, cuts, retinal detachment, and optic nerve damage. The safest place to view fireworks is at a professional display.

Anyone who sustains an eye injury should contact Park Ophthalmology or the emergency room medical doctor as soon as possible. Dr. Friedland is always happy to answer patient questions about proper protective eyewear. Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule a complete vision examination.

The staff at Park Ophthalmology wishes all of our patients and friends the warmest Hanukkah and Christmas Seasons and a Happy New Year!

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: arztamui, freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology Helps Triangle Patients Understand Eye Surgery

man looking far awayWinter is approaching quickly in Raleigh-Durham. Triangle area residents are starting to enjoy ice skating at the Raleigh’s outdoor Winter Fest rink and visiting the area’s many light displays. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology wants all of her patients to fully enjoy the holiday season with the best vision possible.

For patients considering a consult and possible surgery to help improve vision, we offer a quick guide to the procedures Beth R. Friedland M.D. performs at Park Ophthalmology:

  • Small Incision Cataract Surgery: Affecting more than half of all Americans older than 65 and with a growing number much younger, cataracts form on the lenses of the eyes and result in blurred or cloudy vision. Cataract surgery is the most frequently performed surgery in the nation and is normally conducted on an out-patient basis. The surgeon makes a tiny incision in the lens and removes the cloudy material. A new artificial lens is then implanted in the eye.
  • Glaucoma Surgery: Eyes need good blood flow to stay healthy. Glaucoma is a condition in which fluid pressures in the eyes are so high that blood flow is reduced or stopped, resulting in vision loss. Glaucoma surgery works to lower the eye pressure and reduces the chances for more vision loss. This is usually an outpatient procedure as well.
  • Refractive Surgery: Patients with nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism can all benefit from refractive surgery. The goal of refractive surgery is to reshape the clear cornea at the front of the eye. This reshaping allows light to pass at the correct angel to the back of eye, the retina, improving vision enough for some people that glasses or contact lenses are no longer needed.
  • Laser Surgery: Because of their accuracy and precision, lasers are now the preferred tool for most eye surgeries. Procedures called LASIK, LASEK or PRK all use a laser to make the necessary corrections to vision. There is little to no discomfort during the surgery and healing is rapid.

Dr. Friedland gladly answers patient questions about when eye surgery could be the best option for improving vision. Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment for a thorough vision exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Explains Common Terms for Eye Patients

woman with glassesBeth R. Friedland M.D. of Park Ophthalmology knows that accurate communication ensures the best eye health and vision possible for all of her patients in the Raleigh-Durham area. She is always eager to help patients understand as much as possible about vision and treatment options.

Dr. Friedland provides this brief list of common terms patients may hear during their eye exams:

  • 20/20 vision: The term “20/20” is used by many to mean “perfect vision.” As a standard, it means that objects 20 feet away are clear to the viewer. However, there are many other aspects to vision – peripheral sight, depth perception, color recognition and eye coordination. A person can have 20/20 vision but still have deficits in one or more of these other areas. Corrective lenses, whether glasses or contacts, are designed to provide vision that is as close to 20/20 as possible.
  • Nearsighted (myopia): Someone who has clearer vision up-close than at a distance has myopia, or nearsightedness. It is important to have clear distance vision for tasks such as driving and sports. Myopia can be corrected with glasses, contacts and sometimes refractive surgery.
  • Farsighted (hyperopia): Just as it sounds, the person who is farsighted sees objects more clearly in the distance than objects that are closer. Reading, computer work, crafts and cooking can all be more difficult for the person with hyperopia. Corrective lenses and surgery are options for patients with hyperopia.
  • Astigmatism: An initial eye examination may be the first time a person hears that he or she has astigmatism, a condition in which a person’s corneas (clear membranes covering the irises) are more oval than round. The American Academy of Ophthalmology estimates that one out of three Americans has astigmatism, often with resulting myopia or hyperopia.
  • Presbyopia: As people enter middle-age, many find themselves holding a book or newspaper at arm’s length to bring it into focus. This is a natural part of aging and is called presbyopia.

Educating patients about their vision is a top priority at Park Ophthalmology. Contact the office today with questions or to schedule a comprehensive vision exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

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