Understanding Cataracts from Beth R. Friedland M.D. & Park Ophthalmology

arztsamui freedigitalphotos.net.jpg 3-9-15Imagine trying to read a computer while looking through a piece of milky glass. This experience is similar to someone trying to see through advanced cataracts. Patients with cataracts here in the Triangle turn to Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology for her expertise in diagnosing and treating this condition.

The team at Park Ophthalmology offers five areas of importance summarizing information from the Mayo Clinic to help patients understand cataract causes and treatments.

Cataracts 101:

  • Clouded lens: A cataract develops as the lens of the eye, located behind the iris, becomes cloudy, causing light to scatter so that images on the retina become blurred.
  • Causes: Age, injury, some genetic disorders and health conditions, such as diabetes, increase the risk of developing cataracts. With age, the eyes’ lenses become more rigid and thicker. Tissues in the lenses may break down, forming clumps that cloud vision.
  • Types of cataracts: Nuclear cataracts affect the center of the lens and may make it more difficult for the patient to distinguish colors. Cortical cataracts begin on the edges of the lens and often cause people to be bothered by glare. Clients noticing halos around lights at night or those who have trouble seeing in bright light could have posterior subcapsular cataracts, which form at the back of the lens.
  • Diagnosis: As with other eye health procedures, Dr. Friedland will conduct a thorough examination to determine if a client’s vision troubles are related to cataracts. The exam will include the normal vision acuity test, a slit-lamp exam and dilation procedure so Dr. Friedland can examine the retina.
  • Treatment: Fortunately, ophthalmologists can offer effective treatment to restore most, sometimes all, of the vision lost to cataracts. Cataract surgery involves removal of the clouded lens and replacement with a new artificial lens that becomes a permanent replacement. Surgery can be performed on an out-patient basis, so there is no need for a hospital stay.

Anyone concerned about night vision, trouble with glare, or increasing problems with reading or driving should contact Park Ophthalmology to schedule a complete eye examination. An in-office exam is the only way to know for certain the cause of vision loss.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: arztsamui, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

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Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Offers Full Range of Eye Care

arztsamui freedigitalphotos.netWhen first searching out a medical professional for eye care, patients can be confused by the differences among opticians, optometrists and ophthalmologists. As part of the on-going efforts to educate clients on all aspects of eye health, Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle area provides a quick introduction to the field of eye care. Her brief tutorial below will help Raleigh-Durham patients understand what kind of eye care professional they need to contact for their specific eye care needs:

The three types of vision care professionals:

  • Opticians: Opticians are professionals who make or sell glasses and contact lenses, for the purpose of correcting vision defects using the prescriptions of ophthalmologists and optometrists. They can check the fit of eyeglasses, help clients decide on the best frames and lenses, and check products to make sure an order has been filled correctly. They also can repair and adjust glasses. Those in need of corrective lenses need to first have an exam by an optometrist or ophthalmologist.
  • Optometrists: Unlike ophthalmologists such as Dr. Friedland, optometrists are not physicians. However, they have completed bachelor’s degrees and then received an additional four years of education to obtain a Doctor of Optometry degree. They perform eye examinations, write prescriptions for corrective lenses, diagnosis eye conditions such as glaucoma and cataracts, and can prescribe medications for eye conditions.
  • Ophthalmologists: Ophthalmologists have graduated from medical school, plus completed internships and residencies. In addition to conducting eye exams and prescribing corrective lenses, ophthalmologists also provide medical treatment for conditions such as glaucoma, eye injuries and infections. They perform surgery for eye problems that include cataracts, crossed eyes and glaucoma. Some ophthalmologists also offer plastic surgery for smoothing wrinkles around the eyes or for drooping eyelids.

Because of her extensive medical training, Beth R. Friedland MD can provide a complete range of eye health services. The friendly staff at Park Ophthalmology is always ready to answer questions about the services provided by Dr. Friedland.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Freedigitalphotoss.net

 

6 Tips For Eye and Makeup Safety

stuart miles eyesAll across the Triangle, from Raleigh and Durham, women everywhere use makeup, bronzer, highlighter, eyeliner, blush and a variety of other cosmetics to enhance the look of their eyes, lashes, brows and appearance. While most cosmetics are safe to use, there are a few aspects of makeup use that can cause serious concern and possible damage.

Here are six tips for keeping your eyes gorgeous and healthy:

  • Keep things clean: Eye makeup is clean and safe when first purchased, but old applicators may grow fungi or bacteria that can end up in your makeup or possibly in your eyes causing serious infections. Some infections can even lead to the blindness in the worst cases. Clean your brushes regularly and change your applicators and makeup every three to six months.
  • Don’t share: It may seem fun to share favorite eye colors and assorted cosmetics with a friend, but someone else’s germs may not be good for you. Also watch out for the “tester” products in the retail store cosmetic departments. These stores should be using single-use applicators, such as clean cotton swabs, if they put makeup on you.
  • Steady hands: Even if you’re not driving, it’s best to avoid applying makeup in the car or on a bus. If you hit a bump at the wrong time, you can scratch your eye or get makeup in it, which can result in serious issues.
  • Check the label: All eye cosmetics are required to list their ingredients on the package. If there is no such label found on the product, it is considered misbranded and illegal. (Some small packages may have the ingredient list on a tear-off sheet with the display.)
  • Never use kohl: Found in some parts of the world, kohl is not approved for use in the United States. Also known as al-kahl, surma or kajal, it contains antimony or lead, which is dangerous and can cause lead poisoning in children. Note: some products may be called “kohl” to indicate color so check labels.
  • Do not use dye: Permanent eyelash and eyebrow dyes can cause serious eye injuries, including blindness. The FDA has not approved any dyes for this use.

If you have a bad reaction to eye cosmetics or cleansing products, call Dr. Beth Friedland, your Triangle Eye Specialist at Park Ophthalmology. You can also report the problem to the FDA.

Being careful in every circumstance, and you will protect your eyes and keep them looking good no matter the occasion.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit:stuart miles, freedigitalphotos.net

Locations in the Triangle NC:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

March is National Save Your Vision Month

David Catillo Dominici ComputerWith so much technology and business blended together here in the Triangle NC, our patients often spend a lot of time working in the Raleigh and Durham area staring at a computer a good part of the day. People who sit in front of computers and other related devices for long periods can often experience headaches or strain in the neck or back.

But the most common symptoms are often overlooked when it comes to eye strain;  blurred vision and dry eyes often are the result that contributes to computer vision eye problems.

March is National Save Your Vision Month. To save your vision while working, try these adjustments for healthy vision in front of your computer:

Your Computer Screen

  • Glare — Check your office or cubicle lighting and use window treatments to avoid a glare on the screen. If you’re using a glare reduction filter, make sure it has the American Optometric Association Seal of Acceptance.
  • Resolution — Use the highest resolution possible to improve your eye comfort.
  • Contrast — You don’t want the monitor too bright or too dim. Be sure you can easily read the letters and see the background.

Your Seated Position

  • Ergonomics — You can find a lot of information out on the web for suggested corrections that can help adjust your chair, computer and desk so that you won’t have any wrist, back or neck strain. For healthy eyes, be sure your monitor and keyboard are straight ahead. The top of the monitor should be just below horizontal eye level, and you should tilt the top of it away from you about 10 or 20 degrees.

Other Eye Tips

  • Check your prescription — Computers are usually further and higher than a typical reading task, so your bifocals may not work. Ask Dr. Beth your Park Ophthalmologist for help with choosing the right glasses for your type of work.
  • Take breaks — Rest your eyes every 20 minutes or so by looking far away, such as out a window for a different visual.

If you ever experience eye strain, blurred vision or dry eyes, talk to Park Ophthalmologist about all of the ways to help save your vision.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit:David Castillo Dominici, freedigitalphoto.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

 

3 Very Interesting Reasons to Avoid Your Eye Exams

Whether you live across the Triangle NC in Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill or any other locale, you probably know someone who has not been to the eye doctor on a regular basis. Many people have a lot of excuses why they put it off. They believe their eyes are just fine. They do not mind squinting to read, or they have stopped driving at night because of the glare. Some hate that puff of air directly in the eye. For others, it can be a cost issue.

In any case, avoiding an eye exam is not that uncommon. According to recent studies, 86 percent of people at risk for eye disease don’t get an annual eye exam.

On the other hand, over 70 percent of Americans age 45 and older fear being blind more than being deaf, and almost 80 percent fear blindness more than having to use a wheelchair. (Lighthouse International Statistics).

So why aren’t you calling the professionals at Park Ophthalmology?

Here are three interesting yet common reasons why people procrastinate:

  • The cost: Money is the big reason. Many people without health insurance or proper vision care don’t want to pay for the exam. But consider this: catching a problem early not only means a better chance of fixing it, but also increases your chances of avoiding expensive surgeries and procedures. In reality, exams are relatively inexpensive as opposed to the discovery of something very serious.
  • Nothing seems to be wrong: Many Triangle residents skip the visit to the eye doctor because they simply don’t “see” anything wrong. Still, even those with perfect vision should receive an eye exam on a yearly or bi-yearly basis. Some eye conditions such as glaucoma, have almost no symptoms, but can cause serious damage. In some cases, your eye doctor can even discover other health problems during your regular eye exam. https://parkophthalmology.wordpress.com/2012/09/10/4-eye-opening-health-concerns/
  • Dislike of exams: Finally, some people simply dislike going to the Ophthalmologist and peering through different machines for those tests. But that little puff of air, while not fun, doesn’t hurt; and it could save your vision someday. Studies show that 80 percent of vision loss is preventable. Remember, hindsight may be 20/20, but by then, it might be too late.

Your eyes are the avenues for discovery and enjoyment. Be focused about how you care for them. You could lose your sight in the blink of an eye.

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This article about the benefits of eye exams is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit: photo by ponsulak courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo Credit: newsroom.aaa.com

Eye Floaters are Never Illusions

Eye floaters are an interesting phenomenon. Sometimes you see them and sometimes you don’t. They may appear as little dots or specks, or they can be long and squiggly as they appear to cross your line of vision. This is not any magic or optical illusion; it is indeed a floater and a common problem among Triangle, NC residents. About 95 percent of people have floaters in their eyes. Fortunately most of these are not a problem.

In many cases, eye floaters are caused by bits of the gel-like vitreous. That’s the clear gel that fills the gap between your retina and lens, which helps maintain your eye shape. Pieces can break apart from the back portion of the eye and then float about.

Most children don’t have floaters because the gel substance tends to break off as we get older. Although rare, surgery is an option to remove floaters if they seriously hamper vision. Talk to our Doctors at Park Ophthalmology if this is something you are having a serious problem with over the course of time.

Most often, these floaters are indeed harmless. Sometimes, they can tug at the eye causing tearing. In these cases, the gel-like vitreous may widen the tear, which can lead to a risk of retinal detachment. This is a very serious situation and you must see a doctor quickly for assessment. It can lead to possible permanent vision loss. So, if you see a lot of eye floaters, blurred or shadowy vision, possibly with light flashes, you must get to an eye doctor immediately. Your retina could be detaching from the back of your eye.

There are also risk factors involved for certain people. Nearsighted individuals have elongated eye shapes, which give them a greater chance of experiencing these problems. Although detachment can occur at any age, it is more likely for those over age 40, and men are affected more often than women. Be sure to get an annual eye exam and immediately report any odd vision changes to our Ophthalmology Team at either our Durham or our Raleigh office.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit: Park Ophthalmalogy

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

What to Expect from Glaucoma Surgery

Do you have glaucoma and live in the Triangle NC? The fear of losing your eyesight can be very scary. And going into surgery to fix it can be disconcerting. Let’s look at what Glaucoma is and what to expect.

Glaucoma is a disease that damages the optic nerve and this can lead to irreversible vision loss.

It is not uncommon and is the second leading cause of blindness. Sometimes, glaucoma is associated with elevated pressure in the eye. Although surgery cannot reverse vision loss, it can reduce that pressure.

Here’s what to expect from your glaucoma surgery:

Type

Dr. Friedland or Dr. Daluvoy will recommend either laser surgery or conventional surgery, depending on the type and severity of your glaucoma. In both cases, the goal is to allow intraocular fluid to escape the clogged drainage canals.

Laser Surgery – In this procedure, doctors focus a laser to make a small opening in the eye’s drainage system, called the trabecular meshwork.

Conventional Surgery – In this method, called trabeculectomy, doctors create a drainage hole using a small tool. This may be done if laser surgery is not effective. This surgery can be done multiple times without harm.

Expectations

You don’t have to stay in the hospital after most glaucoma surgeries. Our Park Ophthalmology doctors perform most of the surgeries in the office. In more critical cases, surgeries can be performed in an area Triangle hospital.

When you are finished, we’ll apply antibiotics to the eye and cover the eye. You’ll also come home with a hard covering, or eye shield, to protect the eye.

You’ll need to wear this eye shield each night for up to a month. For the next several weeks, you’ll also need to avoid any activity that jars the eye, such as bending, lifting or straining.

Follow Up

The day after surgery, you’ll come in for a checkup. Otherwise, it will take a little time for get back to normal; we’ll be sure to let you know when you can stop wearing the eye shield.

Most people experience some mild discomfort after a trabeculectomy, but severe pain may be a sign of complications. If you have severe pain, call us immediately.

Surgery can almost feel as scary as losing your eyesight, but don’t be afraid to ask any questions. With preparation and a little knowledge, the process will feel much easier. According to the Glaucoma Research Foundation (http://www.glaucoma.org), it is estimated that over 2.2 million Americans have glaucoma but only half of those know they have it. Come see us for a checkup and that sense of assurance that comes with knowing. We are here to help.

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This article about the benefits of eye care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo Credit: photo by graur codrin courtesy of freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: parkeyemd@gmail.com

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology