In the Triangle, Give Those Eyes a Vacation

Park 08-17-15 anankkml FDP  ID-100112019Just as people get refreshed from taking time off, their eyes also benefit from taking a vacation. Park Ophthalmology serves Triangle area patients by passing along vacation advice for good eye health. Dr. Beth R. Friedland wants all of her clients to understand how eye problems can be prevented with professional care, proper rest, and good daily vision habits.

Park Ophthalmology Offers four simple habits that contribute to excellent eye health:

  • Put down the book: That latest suspense novel might seem too exciting to put down, but whether it’s on an e-reader or in hardback, reading for hours without a rest is never a good idea. The eyes need to occasionally focus on something across the room or out a window for a few minutes. For those tempted to read non-stop, use a smart phone’s timer function as a reminder to look up from the words every 20 minutes or so.
  • Prevent digital eyestrain: Those who use computers more than two hours daily are at a greater risk for what the American Optometric Association calls “computer vision syndrome.” This is partly because people blink less while staring at a computer; they often are looking at a screen with a glare and don’t have the screen positioned correctly to prevent eyestrain. As with reading, the key to good eye health is to take frequent breaks from computer use and focus on something far away to rest the eyes.
  • Get enough rest: It may sound simplistic, but rest and sufficient sleep keep the eyes healthy and at their optimum. Stress and fatigue can contribute to eyestrain. Just as sleep refreshes the body, sleep also allows the eyes to be replenished with essential nutrients.
  • Change locations: Dry eyes can result from air-conditioning, room fans and heating systems. Any dry moving air can irritate eyes. If possible, work in an area away from the fan or heating/AC outlet. If that isn’t possible, remember the above habit of taking a break every 20 minutes from the computer, digital device or book.

The friendly staff at Park Ophthalmology can provide even more suggestions to enhance eye health. Call the office today to schedule an annual exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eye wear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Photo: anankkml, freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., vision correction, eye glasses, Triangle, contact lenses, eyestrain, computers, reading, e-readers, digital eyestrain, dry air, dry eyes, sleep, eye health, rest

 

6 Ways Triangle College Students Can Maintain Eye Health

Park 08-03-15 nenetus FDP ID-100342606As the new school year and autumn quickly approach, Triangle area parents are helping their college-bound sons and daughters get ready for the big move to dormitory or apartment life and the exciting opportunity of higher education.

The staff at Park Ophthalmology and Beth R. Friedland M.D. offer six important ways students can maintain their eye health while away from home:

  • Keep contact lenses out of water: Although it is tempting to leave contacts in place for showering or swimming, the time saved isn’t worth the risk. Exposure to water makes contacts more susceptible to transmitting an eye infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis. Always use contact lens solution for cleaning, and never use tap water.
  • Enjoy some time outside: Studies have found that scholars grow increasingly nearsighted as they spend more years in school. A study presented to the American Academy of Ophthalmology in 2011 concluded that as young people increase their time outdoors, they reduce their risk of nearsightedness.
  • Wash hands: Everyone knows that hand washing is an effective way to prevent the spread of colds and flu. This simple habit also can prevent the spread of conjunctivitis, or pink eye.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule: Prevent eye strain by resting the eyes every 20 minutes while reading or working on the computer. Look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Use a smart phone’s timer to set a reminder to look up from the books or the computer screen or device.
  • Toss old makeup: Bacteria can grow in creams and liquids, including those liquid eye-liners and mascaras. Don’t share makeup with others and throw out makeup after three months or if diagnosed with an eye infection.
  • Use sports glasses: Many sports, including baseball, hockey, basketball and lacrosse, put players at risk for injuries, including scratches to the eye or broken bones around the eye. Players can find polycarbonate sports glasses to cut down the risk of injury from other players and equipment.

If your college-bound student needs an eye exam and check-up, call the office of Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment. Our staff and Dr. Friedland are always happy to share tips on eye health with our patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo: nenetus, freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., college, university, nearsightedness, myopia, studying, eye strain, sports vision, makeup, eye infections, contact lenses

 

6 Low Vision Strategies to Help Seniors from Park Ophthalmology

Park 7-20-15 zirconicusso ID-100233460The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) has declared July “Celebrate Senior Independence Month” and has issued six helpful ideas for seniors diagnosed with low vision. According to the Academy, more than 2.5 million senior Americans have low vision, which cannot be improved by corrective lenses or surgery. Dr. Beth R. Friedland wants her patients in the Triangle to be aware of how they can retain their independence, even with a diagnosis of low vision. Park Ophthalmology is the Triangle’s trusted source for vision information.

Now, what is low vision? Low vision is a vision problem that is not correctable through any therapy or surgery. It might include partial vision, blurriness, tunnel vision, and in some cases blind spots. Many individuals in this inoperable situation can be considered legally blind.

Park Ophthalmology offers the AAO’s six tips for helping people with low vision maintain their independence:

  • Set the scene: A simple change, such as grouping furniture in small settings, means less distance vision is needed during conversations. Patterns in furniture and rugs can be visually confusing. Textured upholstery is better because it gives clues to the item by touch, rather than by sight.
  • Contrast and color: Items can be seen better when they are brightly colored or contrast with surroundings. Some areas for colors and contrasts include switch plates, steps, doorknobs, electrical outlets and landings.
  • Brighten it up: Those with low vision can benefit from brighter lighting. Add floor lamps or specific task lighting for crafts or cooking. Allow natural light in through the windows.
  • Tech solutions: Smartphones and tablets can be configured with larger text for reading. Voice command software can answer questions, automatically dial phone numbers, and create voice memos.
  • Remove hazards: Area rugs and waxed floors present slip and fall risks. Tape area rugs to the floor, use non-glare floor products and move electrical cords and cables from walkways.
  • Schedule regular eye exams: During a full eye exam, Dr. Friedland will determine the type and degree of vision loss. She will recommend appropriate treatment and follow-up care. Some low vision can get worse without monitoring and treatment so it is vitally important to keep a regular schedule of eye exams.

Concerned about yourself or a loved one with low vision? Contact Park Ophthalmology today to schedule a complete eye exam.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: zirconicusso, freedigitalphotos.net

 

5 Types of Eye Injuries that Require Quick Medical Attention

Park 07-06-15 100255310 phasinphoto FDPEye injuries can range from those that heal on their own to more serious problems than can permanently damage vision. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology wants her patients to understand some common types of injuries and what to do about them. Certain injuries may require a trip to Park Ophthalmology’s office or to a Raleigh emergency room.

Five types of eye injuries that can require a trip to the doctor or emergency room:

  • Eye Scratches: If a speck of dust or other foreign object touches the eye, a person’s first reaction often is to rub. Resist that urge! Rubbing aggravates the problem. Although most minor scratches resolve on their own, they can become infected and should be examined by a doctor.
  • Foreign objects in the eye: Glass, wood splinters and bits of metal can penetrate the eye. Whenever this happens, a trip to urgent care or the emergency room is appropriate. No one should try to remove such an object.
  • Chemical burns: Cleaning products can spatter and splash into the eyes, causing irritation and burning. Flush the affected eye with tepid water for a full 15 minutes immediately after contact, then contact a doctor, urgent care or emergency room to get advice on what to do next.
  • Eye bleeding: Minor injuries to the eye can cause internal bleeding, turning the white of the eye bright red. This looks worse than it is, does not threaten vision and will resolve itself in a matter of weeks. Nevertheless, anyone concerned about the injury that caused the bleeding is always encouraged to have it checked out by Dr. Friedland.
  • Impact injuries to the Eye: Impacts by baseballs, hockey sticks, bats and sports equipment can break facial bones and can cause permanent vision loss. Whenever something hard impacts the eye, the patient should be examined by a doctor.

Contact Park Ophthalmology today to find out how to prevent eye injuries as Dr. Friedland encourages all of her patients to learn as much as possible about how to maintain eye health.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

Photo: phasenphoto, freedigitalphotos.net

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Park Ophthalmology Shares the History of Eyeglasses

park 06-22-15 10042661fdp photostockFor anyone who has trouble seeing and needs vision correction, it’s almost impossible to imagine life without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Across the Triangle, Raleigh, and Durham, Dr. Beth R. Friedland and Park Ophthalmology offer patients the latest innovations in eye health and vision correction. Of course, we all know that even in 2015, the classic way to see more clearly is through the use of prescription glasses. And it is interesting to note that eyeglasses have a long history, going back 800 years to the late 1200’s in Italy. Today in California, the Museum of Vision in San Francisco has compiled an extensive collection of information on the history of Ophthalmology. It “sees” thousands of visitors a year so let’s “look” at some interesting innovations.

Park Ophthalmology shares six museum facts about the history of eyeglasses:

  • Invention: As earlier stated, the first known eyeglasses were crafted in Italy. Used mostly by scholars and monks, these spectacles were either balanced on the nose or held up to the eyes, as they were made without any temple pieces.
  • Side pieces: In the 1700s, eyeglasses took great leaps forward, the first of which was the addition of side or temple pieces that fit over the ears. No longer did they have to be balanced or held in place.
  • Bifocals: The second key invention in the 1700s was the development of bifocals by Benjamin Franklin. Today, patients are more likely to opt for progressive lenses, which remove the characteristic bifocal line. Progressive lenses were first developed in 1959 and have grown in popularity since then.
  • Sunglasses: Although not always used for vision correction, sunglasses play an important part in protecting eyes from harsh glare and sun damage. They first became culturally popular in the 1930’s, but World War II gave sunglasses an additional boost in popularity as military pilots discovered the benefits of lenses that absorbed ultraviolet and infrared light.
  • Fashion statement: During the latter half of the 20th century and on into the 21st, eyeglasses have become fashion statements. Prescription sunglasses allow people to carry their fashion look into any activity.

 

Whether you need an updated look, or new prescription for eyewear, Dr. Friedland and the staff at Park Ophthalmology can merge vision-correcting lenses with the latest fashion frames. It is important to add prescription sunglasses to protect the eyes from sun damage.

Call the offices of Beth R. Friedland M.D., the Triangle’s Eye Specialist, to set up an exam time. In the Triangle, clarity now offers many choices with the experts at Park Ophthalmology.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: photostock, freedigitalphotos.net

 

The Human Eye Offers a Window into a Patients’ Health and Well Being

Park 06-08-15 Serge Bertasius Photography FDPOf all the complex parts of the human eye, the pupil is the easiest to observe at work. The pupil grows or shrinks, depending on light conditions. A complete eye exam Park Ophthalmology usually includes pupil dilation, which allows Dr. Beth R. Friedland the best possible view of the inner parts of the eye.

Park Ophthalmology has gathered five fascinating facts the about pupils to share with our Raleigh-Durham area patients:

  • Shape: Human pupils are circular; interestingly, a trait they share with dogs, wolves and Siberian tigers. House cats have vertically slit pupils, while goats, horses, and frogs have horizontally slit pupils. Scientists speculate that these differences are connected to when animals are most active and their need to see in different light conditions.
  • Dilation and constriction: Muscles that run through the iris like the spokes of a wheel control the dilation (enlarging) and constriction (closing) of the pupil. Dilated pupils allow more light to reach the retina, aiding vision. In bright light, the iris makes the pupils smaller to cut down on glare and protect the eye.
  • Pupils and attraction: When humans look at people they find attractive, their pupils become larger. In fact, a study focused on pupil size discovered that men found photos of women with larger pupils more attractive than those with smaller pupils.
  • Changes with age: As a human ages ages, the muscles that control dilation and constriction lose strength and the pupils do not react as quickly to changes in light. It may be more difficult to go from a brightly lit environment to one with dim lighting, such as a movie theater.
  • Dilation for examination: If an exam requires dilation, eye drops will be used to enlarge the pupils. Some conditions diagnosed during dilation can include diabetes, high blood pressure, macular degeneration, retinal detachment and glaucoma.

The pupil plays a key role in delivering clear vision. Dr. Friedland and the staff at Park Ophthalmology ensure that each patient feels comfortable with the exam and treatment. Check with the office if you have any concerns about dilation during an eye exam. Remember, anything involving the eyes, call the Triangle’s Eye Specialist, Beth R. Friedland M.D.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: Serge Bertasius Photography, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

Park Ophthalmology Clarifies the Differences in Contact Lenses

Park 05-11-15 ID100111139 marin fdpSelecting eyeglasses is simple. Pick out a frame that looks good and the doctor will make sure the lenses provide vision correction. But as ophthalmology and technology continue to make advances, patients of ophthalmologist Dr. Beth R. Friedland find they have more and more choices. Park Ophthalmology offers Triangle area patients the latest innovations and the helpful staff is always available to answer questions about new products.

Park Ophthalmology shares five aspects of vision correction from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration about contact lenses:

  • Prescriptions required: Contact lenses are classified as medical devices. As such, they cannot be dispensed without a valid prescription. Clients need to have their vision checked annually to make sure they have the correct prescription.
  • Soft lenses: Soft contact lenses are flexible plastic and allow oxygen to pass through to the cornea. They may be easier to adjust to and more comfortable than rigid lenses.
  • Rigid lenses: Sometimes called “hard” contact lenses, rigid gas permeable contact lenses may provide clearer vision than soft contacts and they last longer. Although they are easier to handle, some patients find them less comfortable to wear than soft lenses.
  • Extended wear: Some soft lenses and a few rigid gas permeable lenses can be worn for up to 30 days, including overnight. Dr. Friedland will consult with clients to determine whether continuous wear lenses are an option and the length of extended wear that is appropriate.
  • Disposable lenses: According to the FDA, most people who use soft lenses choose disposable contacts. While some people replace lenses daily, a common practice is to take them out before bed, place them in a disinfecting solution overnight and use them again the next day. Dr. Friedland will advise clients of the best cleaning solution to use for specific lenses.

Contact lenses continue to grow in popularity and ease of use. Unlike glasses, contacts provide a full field of vision, a benefit to those who enjoy playing sports. Making a choice doesn’t have to be overwhelming. Park Ophthalmology welcomes all questions about the latest developments in contact lenses.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo: Marin, freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology