5 Facts about Pink Eye Causes and Treatment in the Triangle

patrisyu FDP 02-16-15 ParkEye irritation is a common reason for visiting Park Ophthalmology in Durham and Raleigh. When the diagnosis is conjunctivitis, commonly called Pink Eye, medical treatment often is necessary. Dr. Beth R. Friedland wants her clients at Park Ophthalmology in Raleigh and Durham to understand the causes, symptoms and treatments for pink eye. Below she provides some important facts, provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Five important facts about Pink Eye (Conjunctivitis):

  • Common causes: Conjunctivitis can have a variety of causes. Sources include infections from bacteria or a virus, allergens, such as dust or pet dander, or irritants, such as chlorine or smoke. Some pink eye infections can be transmitted from one person to another.
  • Areas affected: Pink eye is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, the tissue inside the eyelid and the white part of the eyeball. This inflammation turns the affected eye a pink or red color. The infection can spread from one eye to the other.
  • Symptoms: Conjunctivitis often feels as if there is dust or grit in the eye. There can be crusting on the eyelashes. Other symptoms include eye discharge, itching or burning, and increased sensitivity to light. Some people may notice blurred vision or eye pain.
  • Treatment: Pink eye caused by a virus should resolve without treatment in one to two weeks. Remove irritants (pet dander, dust, smoke) to help those sensitive to those factors. Eye drops can also help relieve irritation. When pink eye is caused by bacteria, eye drops with antibiotics can shorten the length of the infection. A visit to Park Ophthalmology will quickly determine whether eye drops or antibiotics are necessary for treatment.
  • Prevention: To prevent spreading contagious pink eye from one person to another, the affected person should frequently wash his or her hands and refrain from touching the affected eye. Family members should not share towels or washcloths.

Conjunctivitis usually is not a serious condition but it can be quite common, annoying and uncomfortable. Contact Dr. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology as soon as possible; if you notice unusual eye discharge, redness or irritation, it probably will not go away.

Annual exams are critical as well. If you have not had an eye exam since moving to the Triangle, make that important call today.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

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Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: patrisyu, freedigitalphotos.net

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., pink eye, conjunctivitis, causes, treatment, symptoms, allergens, viruses, bacteria, irritation

 

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Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle Spotlights New Research with AMD

pannawat FreedigitalphotosRecent research may provide a clue into the origin of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), an eye condition that affects about 20 percent of Americans older than 75. Conducted by the University College London Institute of Ophthalmology, the study found that tiny calcium deposits within the eyes could play a role in the development of AMD. For those who would like to know more, Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology directs readers to an article on the website mdthink.com that summarizes the findings. A more detailed description of the work appears on the UCL website.

Five important characteristics about AMD:

  • Disease progression: AMD causes the vision to slowly deteriorate. It affects central vision first, causing objects straight ahead to appear blurry. This loss of clarity can interfere with daily tasks such as reading, cooking and driving.
  • Risk factors: The National Eye Institute reports that some people have a higher risk for developing AMD. Smokers have about twice the risk of non-smokers. AMD affects Caucasians more than those of other races. Those with a family history of AMD are also at increased risk.
  • Drusen deposits: A characteristic of AMD is the buildup of protein and fat deposits, called “drusen,” on the retina. The latest research also found tiny calcium spheres on the retina, which could be the starting point for the drusen buildup.
  • Earlier diagnosis: The research suggests that AMD can be diagnosed at an earlier stage if the calcium spheres can be seen on examination. Earlier diagnosis could result in better outcomes for patients, and possibly a technique for preventing or reversing the drusen buildup.
  • Prevention: Some lifestyle factors may help prevent AMD. The National Eye Institute advises not smoking, eating a diet rich in green leafy vegetables and fish, getting regular exercise and maintaining normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

An annual eye exam with Dr. Friedland at Park Ophthalmology includes testing for AMD. Call the office today to schedule your next appointment. It will make a difference.

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Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pannawat, Freedigitalphotos.net