6 Ways Triangle College Students Can Maintain Eye Health

Park 08-03-15 nenetus FDP ID-100342606As the new school year and autumn quickly approach, Triangle area parents are helping their college-bound sons and daughters get ready for the big move to dormitory or apartment life and the exciting opportunity of higher education.

The staff at Park Ophthalmology and Beth R. Friedland M.D. offer six important ways students can maintain their eye health while away from home:

  • Keep contact lenses out of water: Although it is tempting to leave contacts in place for showering or swimming, the time saved isn’t worth the risk. Exposure to water makes contacts more susceptible to transmitting an eye infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis. Always use contact lens solution for cleaning, and never use tap water.
  • Enjoy some time outside: Studies have found that scholars grow increasingly nearsighted as they spend more years in school. A study presented to the American Academy of Ophthalmology in 2011 concluded that as young people increase their time outdoors, they reduce their risk of nearsightedness.
  • Wash hands: Everyone knows that hand washing is an effective way to prevent the spread of colds and flu. This simple habit also can prevent the spread of conjunctivitis, or pink eye.
  • Practice the 20-20-20 rule: Prevent eye strain by resting the eyes every 20 minutes while reading or working on the computer. Look at something 20 feet away for 20 seconds. Use a smart phone’s timer to set a reminder to look up from the books or the computer screen or device.
  • Toss old makeup: Bacteria can grow in creams and liquids, including those liquid eye-liners and mascaras. Don’t share makeup with others and throw out makeup after three months or if diagnosed with an eye infection.
  • Use sports glasses: Many sports, including baseball, hockey, basketball and lacrosse, put players at risk for injuries, including scratches to the eye or broken bones around the eye. Players can find polycarbonate sports glasses to cut down the risk of injury from other players and equipment.

If your college-bound student needs an eye exam and check-up, call the office of Park Ophthalmology today to schedule an appointment. Our staff and Dr. Friedland are always happy to share tips on eye health with our patients.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Photo: nenetus, freedigitalphotos.net

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Tags: Park Ophthalmology, Apex, Raleigh, Durham, Beth R. Friedland M.D., college, university, nearsightedness, myopia, studying, eye strain, sports vision, makeup, eye infections, contact lenses

 

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5 Types of Eye Injuries that Require Quick Medical Attention

Park 07-06-15 100255310 phasinphoto FDPEye injuries can range from those that heal on their own to more serious problems than can permanently damage vision. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology wants her patients to understand some common types of injuries and what to do about them. Certain injuries may require a trip to Park Ophthalmology’s office or to a Raleigh emergency room.

Five types of eye injuries that can require a trip to the doctor or emergency room:

  • Eye Scratches: If a speck of dust or other foreign object touches the eye, a person’s first reaction often is to rub. Resist that urge! Rubbing aggravates the problem. Although most minor scratches resolve on their own, they can become infected and should be examined by a doctor.
  • Foreign objects in the eye: Glass, wood splinters and bits of metal can penetrate the eye. Whenever this happens, a trip to urgent care or the emergency room is appropriate. No one should try to remove such an object.
  • Chemical burns: Cleaning products can spatter and splash into the eyes, causing irritation and burning. Flush the affected eye with tepid water for a full 15 minutes immediately after contact, then contact a doctor, urgent care or emergency room to get advice on what to do next.
  • Eye bleeding: Minor injuries to the eye can cause internal bleeding, turning the white of the eye bright red. This looks worse than it is, does not threaten vision and will resolve itself in a matter of weeks. Nevertheless, anyone concerned about the injury that caused the bleeding is always encouraged to have it checked out by Dr. Friedland.
  • Impact injuries to the Eye: Impacts by baseballs, hockey sticks, bats and sports equipment can break facial bones and can cause permanent vision loss. Whenever something hard impacts the eye, the patient should be examined by a doctor.

Contact Park Ophthalmology today to find out how to prevent eye injuries as Dr. Friedland encourages all of her patients to learn as much as possible about how to maintain eye health.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

Photo: phasenphoto, freedigitalphotos.net

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

 

Park Ophthalmology Shares the History of Eyeglasses

park 06-22-15 10042661fdp photostockFor anyone who has trouble seeing and needs vision correction, it’s almost impossible to imagine life without eyeglasses or contact lenses. Across the Triangle, Raleigh, and Durham, Dr. Beth R. Friedland and Park Ophthalmology offer patients the latest innovations in eye health and vision correction. Of course, we all know that even in 2015, the classic way to see more clearly is through the use of prescription glasses. And it is interesting to note that eyeglasses have a long history, going back 800 years to the late 1200’s in Italy. Today in California, the Museum of Vision in San Francisco has compiled an extensive collection of information on the history of Ophthalmology. It “sees” thousands of visitors a year so let’s “look” at some interesting innovations.

Park Ophthalmology shares six museum facts about the history of eyeglasses:

  • Invention: As earlier stated, the first known eyeglasses were crafted in Italy. Used mostly by scholars and monks, these spectacles were either balanced on the nose or held up to the eyes, as they were made without any temple pieces.
  • Side pieces: In the 1700s, eyeglasses took great leaps forward, the first of which was the addition of side or temple pieces that fit over the ears. No longer did they have to be balanced or held in place.
  • Bifocals: The second key invention in the 1700s was the development of bifocals by Benjamin Franklin. Today, patients are more likely to opt for progressive lenses, which remove the characteristic bifocal line. Progressive lenses were first developed in 1959 and have grown in popularity since then.
  • Sunglasses: Although not always used for vision correction, sunglasses play an important part in protecting eyes from harsh glare and sun damage. They first became culturally popular in the 1930’s, but World War II gave sunglasses an additional boost in popularity as military pilots discovered the benefits of lenses that absorbed ultraviolet and infrared light.
  • Fashion statement: During the latter half of the 20th century and on into the 21st, eyeglasses have become fashion statements. Prescription sunglasses allow people to carry their fashion look into any activity.

 

Whether you need an updated look, or new prescription for eyewear, Dr. Friedland and the staff at Park Ophthalmology can merge vision-correcting lenses with the latest fashion frames. It is important to add prescription sunglasses to protect the eyes from sun damage.

Call the offices of Beth R. Friedland M.D., the Triangle’s Eye Specialist, to set up an exam time. In the Triangle, clarity now offers many choices with the experts at Park Ophthalmology.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: photostock, freedigitalphotos.net

 

Learn About Diabetes and Vision Health from Beth R. Friedland M.D. at Park Ophthalmology

Park 05-04-15 marin fdp ID100111155Diabetes is one of the most common medical conditions that affects vision. The American Diabetes Association reports that each year, 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes. At Park Ophthalmology, Dr. Beth R. Friedland works to educate her Triangle area patients about what they can do to maintain eye health while living with diabetes. Diabetic adults should maintain regular check-ups with Dr. Friedland and an eye care professional on a schedule determined by these professionals.

Patients diagnosed with diabetes or at risk of diabetes should become familiar with the following four bullets of information from Park Ophthalmology:

  • Exam recommendations: The American Diabetes Association recommends that adults with type 1 diabetes get a complete eye exam within five year of diagnosis, and those with type 2 be examined soon after diagnosis. Diabetics who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant also need exams.
  • Blurred vision: Diabetes can cause temporary blurred vision. This happens when blood sugar rises out of the target range and causes the eyes’ lenses to swell, resulting in blurred vision. If blurriness continues after sugar levels have fallen, it is time to check with the doctor.
  • Diabetic retinopathy: This is the most common eye disease for diabetics and a major cause of blindness in American adults. The National Eye Institute explains that diabetic retinopathy changes the blood vessels in the retina. Vessels may swell, leak fluid or grow abnormally. All of these changes will impair vision.
  • Cataracts and glaucoma: Diabetics are at greater risk for developing cataracts and glaucoma. Cataracts cloud the eyes’ lenses and diabetics develop them at younger ages than those without the disease. Glaucoma is an increase of fluid pressure in the eye that creates damage to the optic nerve. Diabetes nearly doubles the risk of developing glaucoma. Treatments exist for both conditions.

Diabetes does not always complicate or compromise vison. Individuals who keep this disease under control and maintain contact with Dr. Friedland have the best chances of maintaining eye health. It can be unsettling when one is diagnosed with diabetes, but Park Ophthalmology can help with those concerns. Contact our Raleigh or Durham offices to schedule an appointment.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: marin/Freedigitalphotos.net

Park Ophthalmology Keeps Triangle Patients in the Driver’s Seat

Park 04-06-15 pakorn fdpA quick trip to the store for eggs and milk can become difficult when vision impairs driving ability. Many vision conditions that hamper driving skills can be corrected with the right eyewear or surgery, provided by Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology. With offices located in Raleigh and Durham, Park Ophthalmology is convenient to everyone in the Triangle. It is important to note that vision is just one factor that makes for a safe driver. Experience, judgment, and response times also play important roles, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Any of the following four situations can make driving more difficult and might indicate it is time for a consultation with Beth R. Friedland M.D.:

  • Road signs: In unfamiliar areas, it is important to be able to read road signs. When vision impairs a driver’s ability to read road names and highway numbers, decision time may be reduced. If it is getting more difficult to read highway signs, it might be time for a new prescription.
  • Peripheral vision: Even while focusing on the road ahead, peripheral vision gives the driver information about vehicles approaching from either side. The American Academy of Ophthalmology notes that diseases such as glaucoma and retinitis pigmentosa contribute to major deficits in peripheral vision.
  • Distance vision: If it is becoming more difficult to judge distances to and from other cars, it is probably time for a check-up. The good news, according to an article in EyeNet Magazine, is that researchers have not found a connection between moderate vision loss and crash-risk. Experienced drivers often find ways to compensate for vision deficits.
  • Night-time driving: This may be the area where age plays the biggest role, as older drivers find it more difficult to filter out glare from the new more powerful halogen head lamps. Driving becomes tougher in lower light situations. Dr. Friedland can help patients understand how their eye conditions affect night-time driving and provide strategies for coping.

Driving a car represents freedom and independence to residents in the Triangle. Stay current on your eye examinations and call Park Ophthalmology today if you have any concerns that vision might be affecting driving skills.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about the vision care is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Office Manager Jenny Whitman, e-mail: jenny.brfeyecare@ncrrbiz.com.

Follow us https://twitter.com/ParkOphthNC

Like us: https://www.facebook.com/ParkOphthalmology

Photo: pakorn, freedigitalphotos.net

 

 

 

 

In the Triangle, Developing Good Vision Habits Helps Prevent Eye Strain

Woman with tabletVision plays an important role every day in all of our lives. We know as well that some popular daily activities can strain the eyes, causing an annoying, but easily remedied, problem. Dr. Beth R. Friedland of Park Ophthalmology in the Triangle (Durham and Raleigh) educates patients on simple and easy ways to avoid eye strain.

Symptoms common to eye strain include headaches, dry or watery eyes, blurred vision, difficulty focusing, fatigue and sensitivity to light. The popularity of electronic devices, such as smart phones and tablets, allow individuals to spend more time looking at bright screens.

Park Ophthalmology suggests that when doing prolonged intense visual work, whether reading or working on a computer, the following six habits can help prevent eye strain:

  • Position Devices Correctly: Being too close to a bright computer or tablet screen can stress the eyes. Try to sit about 25 inches away from the computer screen, with it slightly below eye level.
  • Take Frequent Breaks: When working intensely on a project, surfing the internet or playing a computer game, take a break every 20 minutes to rest the eyes. Focus on something across the room to give the eyes a rest.
  • Use Proper Lighting: Some people develop eye strain as a result of the computer screen’s glare. Filters can reduce glare and most devices have settings that reduce the screen brightness.
  • Adjust Text Size: Instead of straining to see text that is too small, use the computer settings to increase the text size or zoom in on images.
  • Get Enough Sleep: Lack of sleep is one of the main causes of eye strain. Even if a deadline is looming, take a break and close your eyes for a few minutes. A 10-minute power nap can do wonders.
  • Practice Good Habits: Use glasses or contact lenses with the most current prescription. Older, incorrect lenses will make the eyes have to work harder. Contact lenses users should remove them for sleep and make sure to follow proper cleaning procedures.

Eye strain is easily preventable by following good vision habits, but if it continues even with all these habits in place, it might be time to schedule an appointment with Park Ophthalmology.

**

Park Ophthalmology welcomes patients from all areas of the Triangle and offers a wide variety of specialized services including surgery for diseases of the eye, vision examinations, eye safety information, sports medicine protective eyewear and counseling, contact lenses and evaluation, and all types of ocular diagnosis and treatment. Many types of surgery are available, including cataract and laser surgery. We are here for you and your eye and overall health. Give us a call today!

This article about eye strain is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

919 846 6915

Photo: freedigitalphotos.net

Sleep Apnea and Eye Health in the Triangle

imagerymajesticMany people in Raleigh and Durham have experienced sleep apnea. This inability to sleep correctly each night puts great strain on the body and affects many organs. While many may guess it impacts the heart, it might be surprising to note that it can also affect the human eye.

In turn, many individuals have excessive sleepiness during the day that affects both work and normal life. Sleep Apnea occurs when the muscles in the throat block the airway, causing breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep.

These continuous pauses can last from a few seconds to a few minutes and may occur up to 30 times per hour. The pauses cause the body to move out of a deep sleep into a lighter sleep. It is exhausting, and the human body agrees. After such exertion, the body does not receive the rest it truly needs causing sufferers to feel sleepy throughout the day.

The Mayo Clinic reports that more than 12 million people in the United States have Obstructive Sleep Apnea. This is not a small number. If you live in the Triangle and think you may have this condition, contact Park Ophthalmology for an evaluation from Beth R. Friedland M.D. today!

Sleep Apnea is a risk for several eye conditions including these important four:

  • Glaucoma: Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) can cause two types of Glaucoma—the second most common cause of blindness. People with severe cases of sleep apnea tend to have more severe cases of glaucoma. It’s crucial for people with OSA to receive an annual eye examination to check for Glaucoma, especially if they experience any changes in vision.
  • Floppy Eyelid Syndrome: This disorder is uncomfortable to those who have it. It causes the eyelids to turn inside-out spontaneously during sleep, which leads to eye watering, stickiness, and blurred vision.
  • Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Nueropathy (NAION): While painless, people with this condition experience sudden vision loss in one eye, usually noticed upon wakening. Up to 6,000 people annually in the United States are diagnosed with NAION, which can cause irreversible vision loss.
  • Papilledema: Obstructive sleep apnea may also cause Papilledema, or swelling of the optic nerve. This swelling can lead to pressure, worsening vision and, in some cases, blindness. Although the links between these conditions and Obstructive Sleep Apnea are not always clear, knowing the links may exist can help ophthalmologists stay alert for these problems.

Call the team at Park Ophthalmology if you experience any signs of these conditions or excessive sleepiness. Remember, regular eye exams are critical to eye health!

**

This article about Sleep Apnea is brought to you by the professional team at Park Ophthalmology located in the Triangle Region of North Carolina.

The information contained in this blog article is intended solely for informational purposes and is not intended to be offered as medical advice.

Locations:

Park Ophthalmology

5306 NC Highway 55, Suite 102 (adjacent to the RTP/ Research Triangle Park)

Durham, NC 27713

Office: 919 544 5375

Fax: 919 544 5829

**

Park Ophthalmology North

6512 Six Forks Road, Suite 105

Raleigh, NC 27615

Office: 919 846 6915

Photo: imagery majestic, freedigitalphotos.net